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Ratebeer.com Beer News March 18, 2005


A Weekly Roundup of the World’s Beer News
Brewers/Industry March 18, 2005      
Written by RateBeer


Santa Rosa, CALIFORNIA -



Newsbits



The Romanian beer market turned in highly dynamic results, reporting a turnover of more than $100 million in 2004 and an increase of 30 % in profits.



Russian president Vladimir Putin signed the revised law on beer sales restriction. The previous version of the law was rejected by Putin. It forbade all drinking in streets, parks, stadiums and public transport. The revised law only bans underage drinkers from drinking in the streets.



Scotland’s biggest beer festival will take place from April 13 to April 16, the Paisley Real Ale Festival will celebrate its 18th year with more than 100 beers from the UK, Germany, Belgium and Holland.



The Vietnamese beer industry has seen large amounts of money pumped into new breweries in recent years. Beer production was 1.37 billion litres in 2004 and is expected to rise to 1.5 billion litres in 2005. However demand is not expected to rise anytime soon and experts predict that the market will be awash with overcapacity.



The Whitbread brewery has sold the original Chiswell street brewery that was built in 1750. The production was transferred in the 1970s to new breweries, rendering the original obsolete.



British consumer group Campaign for Real Ale has criticized the one penny increase in the beer duty. They wanted the duty to be frozen on the belief that it would reduce the amount of beer being smuggled into the country. The tax rise follows recent wholesale price increases by some brewers.



The export of Czech beer was up 24 percent in 2004 while overall production increased by 1.1 percent. More than 14 percent of the country’s beer is exported and the biggest importer of Czech beer is Germany.



Dix Barbeque and Brewing of Vancouver, BC, has announced the first-in-BC Cask IPA festival on April 30th. The festival gathers a couple dozen of British Columbia’s IPAs in one place for the first time. All the beer will be served cask-conditioned, and it would not be a stretch to suggest there may be a little bit of dry-hopping involved as well.



New Releases



Heineken will be testing the United States market with a new beer, Heineken Premium Light Lager, they’re hoping to compete with Miller Light and Bud Light brands.



Canada’s two giant macrobreweries will release their own caffeinated beers, Molson’s Kick and Labatt’s Shok. The caffeine in the beers comes from guarana, an extract from a climbing shrub in the Amazon region.



The Quebec craft beer market has seen two new beers releases last week, Unibroue’s Seigneuriale, which is a classic revisited from the Seigneuriale brewery bought by Unibroue owner Sleeman previously. The other release is Bieropholie’s MacKroken Flower, this limited edition Scotch Ale is the winner of a homebrewing competition hosted by Bieropholie in which the winner of the first prize got his beer bottled and distributed.



Rhode Island’s Coastal Extreme Brewing has released their spring seasonal Thunderhead Irish Red, available in bottles and on draught.


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