RateBeer

Brits and American beers

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BlackHaddock
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beers 4978 º places 434 º 15:39 Tue 6/11/2013

I think the Brits with the biggest ratings of US beers are all under 40 years of age.

No one in the UK gave a hoot about American beers until the internet: Michael Jackson had written a few words in his books and had one slot in his Channel 4 show íThe Beer Hunterí, otherwise we knew nothing about the US apart from Bud. Nothing came to the UK from over the pond.

Today they are all the rage for some, but mostly only the younger set: a beer holiday for an over 40 is to Germany or Belgium, so many younger íbeer huntersí now visit the US rather than stay in Europe. Even bog standard supermarkets are stocking American bottles these days.

Agree or disagree?

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InvalidStout
16:00 Tue 6/11/2013

Older people prefer not to visit rogue terrorist states on holiday, perhaps.

 
HogTownHarry
premium
beers 6293 º places 28 º 17:47 Tue 6/11/2013

Chris? CHRIS??????

 
tdtm82
beers 1260 º places 108 º 18:13 Tue 6/11/2013

Disagree entirely. The US craft brewing scene which we know of today really started evolving in the middle of the 1990ís

People whom would go onto create US breweries would try English beer in England. This gave them an incentive to brew beer. They liked it. They just couldnít find our hops or our malts but they wanted to brew something with more flavour than the mainstream stuff.

People in the UK largely drink bitter or German-style American-made lagers. There are people of all ages whom drink all sorts of different styles. People in England travel around Europe frequently but less to the US due to flight costs. The average personís holiday is still a trashy holiday resort but for beer hunters any destination is relevant as long as the beer is good.


 
HogTownHarry
premium
beers 6293 º places 28 º 21:42 Tue 6/11/2013

No disrespect, honest question to OP: "biggest" meaning MOST or meaning HIGHEST ratings of American beers? People here in Canada ask me as a relatively unlettered beer fan "whatís the best country in the world for beer" and are always - ALWAYS - shocked by my answer, which is "America - most of the best and worst beer on this planet comes from the USA" ... based on size, itís clearly Belgium, but overall ... love them or hate them, my southern neighbo(u)rs have forced a sea change in the world of beer for everyone over the past generation ... the most? shit, I donít know - but a lot. Do I care? Christ no - I just know itís an exciting time to be a beer geek and I love whatís happening in the Oooo-sah, Blighty and even in my staid, Victorian Ontario / Canada. Peace to you all, and enjoy the beer. We spend a lot longer dead than alive and Iím sadly afraid there ainít no beer in the afterlife.

 
cgarvieuk
premium
beers 17635 º places 212 º 21:46 Tue 6/11/2013

Im over 40. But yeah it was the internet that opened my Eyes to US beer, this site in particular.

Now I dont necessarily think US beer is best. I love my Cask ales, but my Fav style is the Imperial stout. Which until recently the UK did not do many of

 
Theydon_Bois
premium
beers 12870 º places 853 º 23:07 Tue 6/11/2013

I donít know everyones ages but of that list I knocked up looking at the top 7 ... 2 are 50+, 2 are 40+ , Iím 40 next year.

 
Theydon_Bois
premium
beers 12870 º places 853 º 23:13 Tue 6/11/2013

Originally posted by InvalidStout
Older people prefer not to visit rogue terrorist states on holiday, perhaps.


Yeah - I tend to stay clear of Scotland aside from the odd day trip to Edinburgh.

 
Erlangernick
beers 1 º places 2 º 23:31 Tue 6/11/2013

Originally posted by tdtm82
Disagree entirely. The US craft brewing scene which we know of today really started evolving in the middle of the 1990ís

People whom would go onto create US breweries would try English beer in England. This gave them an incentive to brew beer. They liked it. They just couldnít find our hops or our malts but they wanted to brew something with more flavour than the mainstream stuff.

People in the UK largely drink bitter or German-style American-made lagers. There are people of all ages whom drink all sorts of different styles. People in England travel around Europe frequently but less to the US due to flight costs. The average personís holiday is still a trashy holiday resort but for beer hunters any destination is relevant as long as the beer is good.





Iíd say youíre a decade or more off there, nearly two.

 
BlackHaddock
premium
beers 4978 º places 434 º 23:52 Tue 6/11/2013

Originally posted by tdtm82
Disagree entirely. The US craft brewing scene which we know of today really started evolving in the middle of the 1990ís

People whom would go onto create US breweries would try English beer in England. This gave them an incentive to brew beer. They liked it. They just couldnít find our hops or our malts but they wanted to brew something with more flavour than the mainstream stuff.

People in the UK largely drink bitter or German-style American-made lagers. There are people of all ages whom drink all sorts of different styles. People in England travel around Europe frequently but less to the US due to flight costs. The average personís holiday is still a trashy holiday resort but for beer hunters any destination is relevant as long as the beer is good.





I have always thought the US main stream beers were brewed by people with German descendents in general and the new wave of brewers were a more mixed bag: and that is why there is so much diversity within the US now. The internet did open my eyes to US beers and more younger guys than myself tend to use the web a lot more for information than I.

The true answer to my question/statement is varied and obviously debatable, so lets see what others think.

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BlackHaddock
premium
beers 4978 º places 434 º 23:54 Tue 6/11/2013

Originally posted by HogTownHarry
No disrespect, honest question to OP: "biggest" meaning MOST or meaning HIGHEST ratings of American beers?


I should have said biggest ífans ofí rather than íratersí.

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