RateBeer
Home >

Barley’s Robert Burns Scottish Export Ale (2003-)

Barley’s Robert Burns Scottish Export Ale (2003-)
     click to upload
Also known as Smokehouse Robert Burns Scottish Export Ale (2003-)
Commercial description
Robert Burns (January 25, 1759 – July 21, 1796) is known as Scotland’s favorite son, the Ploughman Poet, the Bard of Ayrshire and simply as "Rabbie." Rabbie was a poet and a lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland, and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a ’light’ Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He also wrote in standard English, and in these pieces, his political or civil commentary is often at its most blunt.

He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement and after his death became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism.

As well as making original compositions, Burns also collected folk songs from across Scotland, often revising or adapting them. His poem (and song) Auld Lang Syne is often sung at Hogmanay (New Year), and Scots Wha Hae served for a long time as an unofficial national anthem of the country. Other poems and songs of Burns that remain well-known across the world today, include A Red, Red Rose, A Man’s A Man for A’ That, To a Louse, To a Mouse, The Battle of Sherramuir, and Ae Fond Kiss.

Every January, Barley’s Smokehouse & Brewpub hosts its Robert Burns Dinner and Robert Burns Scottish Export Ale Tapping to celebrate his birthday and ato toast to His Immortal Memory. The feast includes haggis, as well as bagpiping, single malt scotch drinking and recitals of many of his poems. This event is considered a high holiday at the ’House.
Proceed to the aliased beer...

Smokehouse Robert Burns Scottish Export Ale (2003-)

The brewer markets this same or near-same product by more than one names. This can be the result of a brewer distributing this beer under different names in different countries, or the brewer simply changing the name, but not the recipe at different points in time.


Copyright © 2000-2015,
RateBeer LLC. All rights
reserved.
about us
About RateBeer
FAQ
Contact/Feedback
New Beers
add
Advanced Search
Add A Beer
Add A Brewer
Add A Place
Events
membership
Log In
Edit Personal Info
Buy Premium Membership
Your Messages
the best
RateBeer Best
100 Beer Club
The Top 50