Skipjack Amber Lager

Brewed by Anheuser-Busch InBev
St. Louis, Missouri USA
5.5% Premium Lager | 30 Ratings |
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (April 30, 2007) – Inspired by the iconic sailboats that are synonymous with Chesapeake Bay, Anheuser-Busch introduces today Skipjack Amber – a smooth, well-balanced amber lager brewed for beer lovers primarily in the Mid-Atlantic region. Available on draught in select bars and restaurants in Washington D.C., Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia, as well as North Carolina, South Carolina, Kentucky and Tennessee, Skipjack Amber is a medium-bodied beer characterized by a rich caramel and roasted nut taste. It is balanced by a complex blend of citrus, floral and spicy hop aromas, and features a refreshing finish and a thick, creamy head. Named in honor of the skipjack sailboats that sail the Chesapeake Bay, this specialty beer was crafted by a small, hand-picked group of beer experts from Anheuser-Busch’s Williamsburg, Va., brewery. The group – which welcomed the opportunity to apply its extensive brewing knowledge and experience to local beer lovers’ preferences and tastes – chose the beer style, created the recipe and selected Skipjack Amber’s name and tap marker design. “As members of the Williamsburg community for more than 35 years, we took great pride in crafting a beer that honors the Mid-Atlantic States and the Chesapeake Bay,” said Dan Driskill, senior brewmaster of Anheuser-Busch’s Williamsburg brewery. “The team tasted a wide variety of amber lagers to determine how to best differentiate this beer. We’re confident adult beer lovers in this region will love it as much as we do.” Skipjack Amber is brewed with two-row and Munich malt, as well as two types of caramel malts, which give the beer a distinctive amber-red hue. It contains a citrus, floral and spicy blend of Saaz, Nelson Sauvin, Alsace and Hallertau hops for a balanced and pronounced flavor.

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Comments


Beer Rating Assistance

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  • AROMA
  • APPEARANCE
  • TASTE
  • PALATE
  • OVERALL

  • Aroma is one of beer's most complex features. Aroma is propelled by lively CO2 and dampened by pillowy heads - especially nitrogen foam. Click on a term below to add it to your tasting notes.

    Malt
    caramel, bread, hay, cereal, chocolate, coffee, nuts, toast, roasty

    Hops
    resin, floral, grass, spruce, citrus, herbs

    Yeast/Bacteria
    dough, barnyard, cheese, basement aromas, leather, earthy, leaves

    Other
    alcohol, banana, bubblegum, butterscotch, clove, cooked vegetables, cough drop, ginger, licorice, raisin, rotten eggs, soy sauce, skunky, smoke, vanilla, woody
    Appearance is how a beer appeals to the eye and includes notes on color, the liquid's visual texture and the head -- the beer's foam top. Click on a term below to add it to your tasting notes.

    Color
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    Liquid
    clear, hazy, cloudy, sparkling

    Head
    rocky, frothy, minimal, white, tan, brown
    Taste is what can be appreciated with the tongue. It's easy to mistake aromas for tastes -- the tongue only senses sweet, bitter, sour, salt and umami. Click on a term below to add it to your tasting notes.

    Sweet
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    Bitter
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    Sour
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    Other
    salty, umami
    The palate includes touch sensations on the lips, tongue, gums and roof of the mouth. Click on a term below to add it to your tasting notes.

    Body
    light, medium, full

    Texture
    thin, oily, creamy, sticky, slick, thick

    Carbonation
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    Finish
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    Your overall score quantifies how much you enjoyed all the beer's elements combined as a sensory experience. Was this a standout beer? Were your expectations met? Did the beer go well with your food? Would you recommend this to a friend? This isn't about how well the beer conformed to its style definition -- it's about a measurement of your own appreciation.