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Baltic Porter


read 847 times • 28 replies • posted 12/28/2013 10:27:52 PM

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bitbucket 2159:63
Seems to be an under-loved style. Looking in my books for guidance, not finding a lot of info. Drawing a complete blank in Designing Great Beers and Radical Brewing.

Canít find my copy of Brewing Classic Styles right at the moment. Just noodling around on the recipe front. So anyway, here is what Iím looking at for a 7 gallon batch:

Gambrinus ESB Malt 19.0lb 83%
Special B 1.0lb 4%
Crystal 40L 1.0lb 4%
Brown Malt 1.0lb 4%
Chocolate 10oz 2%

Hop Amount Time
Perle (US) 1.67 oz 60 min
Saaz (CZ) 2.0 oz 30 min

Yeasts
Fermentis Saflager S-23

Any thoughts? Iím guessing that the White Labs German Lager is probably the preferred route, but I want to try the SafLager.

For hops, Iím going for geographic proximity to the Baltic countries.
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SamGamgee 2452:182
My take. Is that itís a big schwarzbier or tmavy. But thatís a continental Baltic porter. Nordic Baltic porter is another thing altogether and looks more like what you are going for, which is an English porter that might have lager yeast.
12/28/2013 10:35:20 PM

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bitbucket 2159:63
According to the calculations, that pencils out to:
1.086 OG
1.021 FG
34 IBU
8.4% ABV
27 SRM
0.4 IBU/OG

Iím betting Iíll get closer to 1.016 FG and 9.0ABV
12/28/2013 10:46:33 PM

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bitbucket 2159:63
Originally posted by SamGamgee
My take. Is that itís a big schwarzbier or tmavy. But thatís a continental Baltic porter. Nordic Baltic porter is another thing altogether and looks more like what you are going for, which is an English porter that might have lager yeast.

So youíre saying it tends to be Continental? But I should go Nordic, which is an imperial brown porter with lager yeast? Am I getting that right? According to the BJCP folks Iím pretty much middle of the road, style-wise, but I tend to the high side on SRM and IBU.

I could go with Carafa to get the color without the roast.
12/28/2013 10:48:30 PM

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joeneugs 3107:147
Originally posted by bitbucket
Drawing a complete blank in Designing Great Beers and Radical Brewing.

Canít find my copy of Brewing Classic Styles right at the moment. Just noodling around on the recipe front.

I have my copy of brewing classic styles in front of me right now. Your recipe looks pretty close to the one they have in there. The only difference is he has some Carafa II in there at about 2.4% of the grain billÖ no brown malt. The Carafa is supposed to get the color and slight roastiness without the bitterness.

Iíve never brewed this style though, so I donít know. What youíve got there sounds great to me!
12/28/2013 10:58:19 PM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by bitbucket
Originally posted by SamGamgee
My take. Is that itís a big schwarzbier or tmavy. But thatís a continental Baltic porter. Nordic Baltic porter is another thing altogether and looks more like what you are going for, which is an English porter that might have lager yeast.

So youíre saying it tends to be Continental? But I should go Nordic, which is an imperial brown porter with lager yeast? Am I getting that right? According to the BJCP folks Iím pretty much middle of the road, style-wise, but I tend to the high side on SRM and IBU.

I could go with Carafa to get the color without the roast.


Agreed.

I would substitute Carafa for your Brown and Chocolate. I know that youíd have to use less to get the color the same, but Iím too lazy to do the calculations.
12/29/2013 4:41:44 AM

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Danko
It depends if you want to approach a historic version or most of the ones available today. It seems a lot of Baltic Porters nowadays are top fermented...
12/29/2013 5:32:31 AM

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SamGamgee 2452:182
Originally posted by Danko
It depends if you want to approach a historic version or most of the ones available today. It seems a lot of Baltic Porters nowadays are top fermented...


And at what point are these top fermented porters not really stylistically different from English porters? Seems like most Scandinavian porters these days are mostly no different than English or American.

Itís always seemed to me that if you want to brew "Baltic Porter" as a distinct style, you should go more for the continental malt/dehusked roasted malts/noble hops/ lager approach. Otherwise youíre just making an English porter.
12/29/2013 8:26:43 AM

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bitbucket 2159:63
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by bitbucket
Originally posted by SamGamgee
My take. Is that itís a big schwarzbier or tmavy. But thatís a continental Baltic porter. Nordic Baltic porter is another thing altogether and looks more like what you are going for, which is an English porter that might have lager yeast.

So youíre saying it tends to be Continental? But I should go Nordic, which is an imperial brown porter with lager yeast? Am I getting that right? According to the BJCP folks Iím pretty much middle of the road, style-wise, but I tend to the high side on SRM and IBU.

I could go with Carafa to get the color without the roast.


Agreed.

I would substitute Carafa for your Brown and Chocolate. I know that youíd have to use less to get the color the same, but Iím too lazy to do the calculations.

According to the BJCP website: "Brown or amber malt common in historical recipes." The brown malt comes in at 65 SRM, so itís not adding a lot of roast. I did ditch the chocolate in favor or Carafa II but could easily be talked into a somewhat larger amount of Carafa I.


12/29/2013 12:03:11 PM

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bitbucket 2159:63
Originally posted by joeneugs
Originally posted by bitbucket
Drawing a complete blank in Designing Great Beers and Radical Brewing.

Canít find my copy of Brewing Classic Styles right at the moment. Just noodling around on the recipe front.

I have my copy of brewing classic styles in front of me right now. Your recipe looks pretty close to the one they have in there. The only difference is he has some Carafa II in there at about 2.4% of the grain billÖ no brown malt. The Carafa is supposed to get the color and slight roastiness without the bitterness.

Iíve never brewed this style though, so I donít know. What youíve got there sounds great to me!

I updated, so right now Iíve got Carafa II at 2.2% of the total malt bill, no Chocolate.
12/29/2013 12:11:58 PM

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admin
Danko
Originally posted by SamGamgee
Originally posted by Danko
It depends if you want to approach a historic version or most of the ones available today. It seems a lot of Baltic Porters nowadays are top fermented...


And at what point are these top fermented porters not really stylistically different from English porters? Seems like most Scandinavian porters these days are mostly no different than English or American.

Itís always seemed to me that if you want to brew "Baltic Porter" as a distinct style, you should go more for the continental malt/dehusked roasted malts/noble hops/ lager approach. Otherwise youíre just making an English porter.

I agree completely. The only difference could be that the Baltic Porter is lighter in color (i.e. Not black, but more deep reddish) than many british porters. But color is not a taste.
12/29/2013 5:14:42 PM

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