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Basque Cider


read 1196 times • 19 replies • posted 9/6/2012 9:35:38 AM

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fiulijn 14978:548
Originally posted by beastiefan2k
Originally posted by levifunk
but the lambic lover in me is intrigued by these Basque ciders.

fwiw, from my small experience French Normandy ciders are a lot more funky or wild than Basque ciders. Also, much more carbonated.

Not exactly.
Spanish ciders, if they are called "natural", can be very acidic; they often have clear lemony notes.
French ciders are rarely sour, they mostly have tannins, therefore they are astringent.

Two completely different families.
Personally I love them both.

I would add England to the team of three, and ask any other country to stop making ciders (I wonít list which countries, but...)
9/6/2012 1:45:48 PM

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levifunk 12:
Also, what does the "Eusko label" for Bosque ciders mean?
9/6/2012 1:56:26 PM

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MacBoost 1326:21
Originally posted by levifunk
Also, what does the "Eusko label" for Bosque ciders mean?


I thought this cider was quite sour and funky, for what itís worth. Available off the shelf from what Iíve been told.
9/6/2012 2:16:28 PM

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GodOfThunder 1247:34
Originally posted by levifunk
Also, what does the "Eusko label" for Bosque ciders mean?


Euskadi is the Basque name for Basque Country autonomous community in Spain.

Euskal Herria is the name for the historic Basque Country. Euskal Herria contains Euskadi and Nafarroa (Navarre) in Spain, and the Northern Basque Country in France.

The Eusko label is on many foods that are produced within Basque Country. I am not sure if it is just Euskadi, or for all of Euskal Herria. Basically, a way to say "we made this." Like "Made In America," or "California Raisins."

Basque people are not Spanish. Yes, they reside in Spain, but they speak another language and consider themselves different. Historically, there has been some tension between Basques and the Spanish, but most of that has died down with time.
9/6/2012 4:08:22 PM

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GodOfThunder 1247:34
Originally posted by levifunk
Originally posted by beastiefan2k
cool video, from the ratings the cider seems to be too industrial.


Agreed. I get the impression that some of these Bosque ciders are commercialized operations. I havenít had any of these, but Iíd like to try some. Does anyone have a recommendation?

Ideally, Iíd like to create something in between the saison/farmhouse style and lambic style......applying it to cider. I get the impression that Bosque ciders are/were that?

I just havenít been able to 1.) try any of these yet and 2.) find any detailed write up of the historical process.


Petritegi, who made the video, is one of the largest producers along with Zapiain.

Most of the producers are very small operations, who use more traditional methods, and donít distribute too far out of the region.

At the museum. they had a great video in English. I was hoping to find it. As I said before, they simply grind everything up, and the yeast/bacteria on the skins does all the work.

It is similar to lambic, and judging by the difference in taste here in the U.S. versus in Spain, will get more sour and/or acidic with age like a lambic. Like any beer, some of the ciders are more sweet, some more acidic.

I know Sarasola is imported to the states. They are a small operation, but somehow were picked up by an importer. Iíve had one other that was imported, but I forget the name. Just look for a green 750 bottle in the best beer store in town. They might have it with other ciders.
9/6/2012 4:16:51 PM

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Glossolalia
Originally posted by fiulijn
Originally posted by beastiefan2k
Originally posted by levifunk
but the lambic lover in me is intrigued by these Basque ciders.

fwiw, from my small experience French Normandy ciders are a lot more funky or wild than Basque ciders. Also, much more carbonated.

Not exactly.
Spanish ciders, if they are called "natural", can be very acidic; they often have clear lemony notes.
French ciders are rarely sour, they mostly have tannins, therefore they are astringent.

Two completely different families.
Personally I love them both.

I would add England to the team of three, and ask any other country to stop making ciders (I wonít list which countries, but...)


I donít know about sour, but Normandy ciders can definitely be funky. One of the farmerís markets here in Tokyo sells Dupont ciders with several years of aging on them (not sure whether this aging is intentional or not), and they can be quite the brett bombs. Quite different than the young bottles Iím used to consuming.
9/6/2012 5:40:47 PM

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3fourths 8100:1312
sidra natural is fermented from skin-resident malic acid (which is preserved in the must) converted into lactic acid (hence the term malolactic fermentation), though some producers pitch strains of saccharomyces to quicken fermentation.


good info here for the homebrewer:

http://www.bizkaia.net/home2/temas/detalletema.asp?tem_codigo=4328&idioma=IN
9/7/2012 10:49:01 AM

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levifunk 12:
Originally posted by 3fourths
sidra natural is fermented from skin-resident malic acid (which is preserved in the must) converted into lactic acid (hence the term malolactic fermentation), though some producers pitch strains of saccharomyces to quicken fermentation.


good info here for the homebrewer:

http://www.bizkaia.net/home2/temas/detalletema.asp?tem_codigo=4328&idioma=IN


Thats a good link. Thanks.

So if I understand this, the idea is that the wild saccro ferments sugar to alcohol and then wild lacto/pedio do the malolactic fermentation. What about the wild brett?
9/7/2012 12:54:06 PM

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levifunk 12:
Also, Iíd like to know how long these typically ferment and what they ferment in.
9/7/2012 12:59:09 PM

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