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Bottling 100% brett beers


read 2063 times • 15 replies • posted 9/10/2012 7:55:36 AM

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CLevar 376:10
Is this a bad idea?

I recently brewed a 100% Wyeast Brett b. fermented beer that had an OG of 1.072. About 30% of the fermentables were "Simple" in that honey was used.

I racked after 4 days of fermentation, and it was down to 1.020, and has pulled down further since, such that I am sitting near 80% apparent attenuation. I plan on throwing in some red wine soaked oak in a week or so (after the gravity has stopped moving), and would like to bottle after a short while on the oak.

My question is this: Am I safe to bottle at 1.010 or a bit more? Or will the brett chew through all of the residual sugar, leading to bottle bombs? I also plan on priming with enough table sugar to hit 2.5 or so volumes of CO2.

Thanks!
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ekoerper 589:39
Iíve wondered about this as well. Are you hoping for Brett development in the bottle? This may be a stupid question, but figured since itís 100% Brett, maybe youíd just want the Brett contribution from primary fermentation to come through as opposed to finishing/bottle conditioning with Brett. If youíre not aiming to increase the Brett character in the bottle, maybe just rack, add gelatin, cold crash to get the Brett out (to the extent possible), then bottle with standard ale/lager yeast to reduce bottle bomb potential?
9/10/2012 8:21:19 AM

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VsXsV 2303:44
Let it sit in the fermenter a lot longer than regular Saccharomyces beer. Brett will chew through a lot of complex sugars. I got almost 100% attenuation in the last brett beer that I made. That took about 10 weeks.

Though, from my experiences Brett doesnít produce as much carbon dioxide as ale yeast, so bottle bombs are a bit rarer than you think. Still, let it sit for a long time.
9/10/2012 8:21:35 AM

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CLevar 376:10
Originally posted by VsXsV
Let it sit in the fermenter a lot longer than regular Saccharomyces beer. Brett will chew through a lot of complex sugars. I got almost 100% attenuation in the last brett beer that I made. That took about 10 weeks.

Though, from my experiences Brett doesnít produce as much carbon dioxide as ale yeast, so bottle bombs are a bit rarer than you think. Still, let it sit for a long time.


What was the OG, and the FG that you bottled at?
9/10/2012 8:37:44 AM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by VsXsV
Let it sit in the fermenter a lot longer than regular Saccharomyces beer. Brett will chew through a lot of complex sugars. I got almost 100% attenuation in the last brett beer that I made. That took about 10 weeks.


Yeah, 8 to 10 weeks is best for Brett B beers and nothing above 1.010. Brett A & C, on the other hand, are more like saccharomyces strains, so youíd be safe bottling those greater than 1.010.

Youíve also got to be patient with them in the bottle. Think 6 - 8 weeks before optimum carbonation as opposed to the 2 - 4 with a normal sac. strain.
9/10/2012 8:49:35 AM

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VsXsV 2303:44
Originally posted by CLevar
What was the OG, and the FG that you bottled at?

OG about 1060, FG 1005. Thatís 91.2% attenuation so not really "almost 100", but still.

Originally posted by HornyDevil
Yeah, 8 to 10 weeks is best for Brett B beers and nothing above 1.010. Brett A & C, on the other hand, are more like saccharomyces strains, so youíd be safe bottling those greater than 1.010.

Youíve also got to be patient with them in the bottle. Think 6 - 8 weeks before optimum carbonation as opposed to the 2 - 4 with a normal sac. strain.

Yep, it was Brett B that I used.
9/10/2012 8:52:04 AM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by VsXsV
OG about 1060, FG 1005. Thatís 91.2% attenuation so not really "almost 100", but still.


Iíve never had a beer with Brett B finish above 1.010. Most of them finish between 1.000 and 1.004.
9/10/2012 8:54:28 AM

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VsXsV 2303:44
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Iíve never had a beer with Brett B finish above 1.010. Most of them finish between 1.000 and 1.004.


I got a bit high carbonation as well so it probably fermented even more in bottle later.
9/10/2012 8:55:29 AM

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CLevar 376:10
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by VsXsV
OG about 1060, FG 1005. Thatís 91.2% attenuation so not really "almost 100", but still.


Iíve never had a beer with Brett B finish above 1.010. Most of them finish between 1.000 and 1.004.


Gotcha, thanks for the info. One of the other reasons I ask is so I donít have the oak in there too long. I will likely just wait till I am at "bottling SG", and add the oak then.

Thanks guys!
9/10/2012 8:56:05 AM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by CLevar
I will likely just wait till I am at "bottling SG", and add the oak then.


Good idea.
9/10/2012 8:57:46 AM

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HornyDevil
FWIW, I brewed a Brett Drie/Trois beer about a week ago and it still has a healthy krausen atop it. It is interesting to watch it progress through fermentation.
9/10/2012 9:00:49 AM

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