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Brewer to brewer, Kolsch is indistinguishable


read 6692 times • 126 replies • posted 5/5/2013 7:14:25 AM

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JK 4520:292
Originally posted by womencantsail
.

In any case, I do agree that it’s not the most exciting style, but I do enjoy kolsch for the simple fact that it is light and refreshing and easy to drink.




Interesting, I did not find them that light or refreshing, but sort of heavy, for what it was. I can’t help but compare this to a pale lager.
5/5/2013 9:02:45 AM

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StefanSD 2150:45
Most surprising thing to me is that Kolsch was among the most expensive beers. But those prices you listed are very reasonable by Socal standards.
5/5/2013 9:03:25 AM

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pinkie 470:10
Originally posted by Bill Becker
I see it as brewing to style so big differences in taste would not be to my liking. I love me a cool, crisp and clean Kölsch.


I do too. I love a good clean kolsch.

Pics of all the pubs you went to in germany are to follow yes?
5/5/2013 9:08:42 AM

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brokensail 11085:866
Originally posted by JK
Originally posted by womencantsail
In any case, I do agree that it’s not the most exciting style, but I do enjoy kolsch for the simple fact that it is light and refreshing and easy to drink.




Interesting, I did not find them that light or refreshing, but sort of heavy, for what it was. I can’t help but compare this to a pale lager.


Perhaps not as light as some other beers, particularly something like a helles, but I guess my sense of light gets thrown off from drinking so many American micros where a "pils" is 7% and a beer that is 4% (or less) is a novelty.
5/5/2013 9:18:08 AM

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Bill Becker 355:1
Originally posted by pinkie
Originally posted by Bill Becker
I see it as brewing to style so big differences in taste would not be to my liking. I love me a cool, crisp and clean Kölsch.


I do too. I love a good clean kolsch.

Pics of all the pubs you went to in germany are to follow yes?


No. Never drank beer in Germany.
5/5/2013 11:17:50 AM

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pinkie 470:10
Whoops. I meant JK should treat us to pics of all the pubs in germany. =)
5/5/2013 11:33:02 AM

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Theydon_Bois 9084:630
I was in Koln last weekend for 3 nights. We probably overlapped.

Not got round to typing up my rates yet but I know what you mean - all very similar. I preffered the brew pubs/taps we hit on that brewed more than just a kolsch to break it up a little!

Best bar in Koln by a country mile was Braustelle. All decent tasty offerings and a firm fingers up to 1516 !
5/5/2013 11:59:19 AM

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rpattinson 84:
Originally posted by JK
Yesterday I returned from fifteen days in Germany, including four days in the Cologne area. I was excited to go to the well known brewers to try the fresh kolsch, a style we hear cannot be truly experienced without going to Cologne. We see this style in the states from time to time, either from brewpubs or occasionally bottled.

I went to Paffgen, Sion Brauhaus, Muhlen, and other restaurants where I tried gravity pours from the barrel. The Sion presentation was impressive, with the fresh barrels brought to the bar by overhead track and lowered with a crane into position for pouring.

I had high hopes for the experience of drinking these beers at their origin, both for the atmosphere of brewpubs as well as the quality of the beers.

I was left with a few impressions:

Kolsch is unreasonably expensive at 1.6-1.8 Euro for .2L, making it the most expensive beer I found in Germany.

At the breweries, one fresh Kolsch is virtually indistinguishable from another. I could perceive little house character or differences between Paffgen, Muhlen, Sion, or Gaffel.

Fresh Kolsch is substantially similar to well made but under-flavored yellow lager. There is a lack of complexity and variety to the style.

I did perceive greater difference between bottled versions of the beer, Fruh and Sion were substantially better than bottled Gaffel.

I have the same comments for Altbier in Dusseldorf, where I went to to Schlussel; Uerige; Fuchschen; Kurzer; and Schumacher. However, the atmosphere of these breweries, where you can smell the beer being brewed as you walk through the streets, and can stop on pleasant tree lined streets to drink in the shade as a very nice experience.

In any event, my Kolsch experience was disappointing.

If you can’t tell the difference between Sion and Paeffgen, you need your palate recalibrating.
5/5/2013 12:25:46 PM

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sthlm 1231:136
Originally posted by rpattinson
Originally posted by JK
Yesterday I returned from fifteen days in Germany, including four days in the Cologne area. I was excited to go to the well known brewers to try the fresh kolsch, a style we hear cannot be truly experienced without going to Cologne. We see this style in the states from time to time, either from brewpubs or occasionally bottled.

I went to Paffgen, Sion Brauhaus, Muhlen, and other restaurants where I tried gravity pours from the barrel. The Sion presentation was impressive, with the fresh barrels brought to the bar by overhead track and lowered with a crane into position for pouring.

I had high hopes for the experience of drinking these beers at their origin, both for the atmosphere of brewpubs as well as the quality of the beers.

I was left with a few impressions:

Kolsch is unreasonably expensive at 1.6-1.8 Euro for .2L, making it the most expensive beer I found in Germany.

At the breweries, one fresh Kolsch is virtually indistinguishable from another. I could perceive little house character or differences between Paffgen, Muhlen, Sion, or Gaffel.

Fresh Kolsch is substantially similar to well made but under-flavored yellow lager. There is a lack of complexity and variety to the style.

I did perceive greater difference between bottled versions of the beer, Fruh and Sion were substantially better than bottled Gaffel.

I have the same comments for Altbier in Dusseldorf, where I went to to Schlussel; Uerige; Fuchschen; Kurzer; and Schumacher. However, the atmosphere of these breweries, where you can smell the beer being brewed as you walk through the streets, and can stop on pleasant tree lined streets to drink in the shade as a very nice experience.

In any event, my Kolsch experience was disappointing.

If you can’t tell the difference between Sion and Paeffgen, you need your palate recalibrating.

5/5/2013 3:15:28 PM

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MartinT 7952:521
Looking for complexity in Kölsch is like looking for complexity in a baguette. It’s utterly pointless. Your goal in drinking Kölsch is finding the freshest, purest expression of simple goodness. Päffgen and Mühlen offered me those experiences last time I went.
5/5/2013 3:39:20 PM

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