RateBeer
home Home > Forums >
Beer Talk | Site News | Beer Trade | Beer Travel | Food/Beer | For Sale | New Here | Homebrew | Non-US | Industry | OT - Lite | OT - Medium

Brewer to brewer, Kolsch is indistinguishable


read 6611 times • 126 replies • posted 5/5/2013 7:14:25 AM

Thread Frozen
Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13

Gazza 726:163
Paffgen and Muhlen are, or were the last time I had them, probably the two extremes of the style (which I admit has quite narrow extremities!), Muhlen being quite grainy/malty whereas the Paffgen had a fairly strong hoppy aroma and finish. Very different IMO but, in the context of comparing different IPAs, maybe quite similar.
5/6/2013 12:01:25 PM

Private message send the author a private message


premium
GT2 8426:598
Letís not continue to derail this thread over the minutiae of what SHIG posted. He is right in that we get a very unfair taste of German beer on this side of the pond: stale low abv lagers and ales that should be drunk fresh on tap. By the time we get to them, they are unhopped estery messes with diacetyl more common than it should. And that warps our vision.

If you are going to buy expensive imported beers, it better be a 99 point Danish imperial stout that you know has held up well. Not a German doppelbock that will undoubtedly be a cloying, thin mess.

That is not to say that German beer as a whole is better or worse than Belgian, American, English, Italian,.... He is commenting that if someone came up to me and said, "Pretty much every German kolsch is the same and uninspiring." I would not be in one bit surprised.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Now to the actual point of this post, I had Koln on my list of places that were "must go" for beer pilgrimages, but now it seems to be not worth the time.

Still on the list are my Michael James stalking trips one day to the Zoiglstube.
5/6/2013 12:31:17 PM

Private message send the author a private message


premium
StefanSD 2130:45
Originally posted by GT2
Letís not continue to derail this thread over the minutiae of what SHIG posted. He is right in that we get a very unfair taste of German beer on this side of the pond: stale low abv lagers and ales that should be drunk fresh on tap. By the time we get to them, they are unhopped estery messes with diacetyl more common than it should. And that warps our vision.

If you are going to buy expensive imported beers, it better be a 99 point Danish imperial stout that you know has held up well. Not a German doppelbock that will undoubtedly be a cloying, thin mess.

That is not to say that German beer as a whole is better or worse than Belgian, American, English, Italian,.... He is commenting that if someone came up to me and said, "Pretty much every German kolsch is the same and uninspiring." I would not be in one bit surprised.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Now to the actual point of this post, I had Koln on my list of places that were "must go" for beer pilgrimages, but now it seems to be not worth the time.

Still on the list are my Michael James stalking trips one day to the Zoiglstube.


I wouldnít cross Koln off my list because of anything that JK, or anyone else, wrote. Iíd still want to experience it for myself and I now want visit Koln even more.
5/6/2013 2:15:54 PM

Private message send the author a private message


premium
JK 4433:283
Cologne was good. Dusseldorf was nice for a day. There is a lot to see in that part of Germany. Beer is only a small part of life.

After thinking about this a little more, it seems like there is almost this mythical quality of Kolsch beer and I was disappointed not to find it.
5/6/2013 2:20:24 PM

Private message send the author a private message


Bilk 16:3
Kolsch- Itís a mystery. Broken into a jigsaw puzzle. Wrapped in a conundrum. Hidden in a Chinese box. A riddle.
5/6/2013 3:36:09 PM

Private message send the author a private message


premium
Bill Becker 322:1
I had a few pints of one brewed in Lander WY, Saturday. Tasty, and went well with my burger. :^)
5/6/2013 3:41:33 PM

Private message send the author a private message


CharmCityCrab 150:
My impression has always been that if a Kolsch is too variant or extreme, itís being done wrong. Kolsch seems like itís supposed to be a fairly refreshing simple style by design. Pale lager-like with a mild amount of springy-type hops and a light grape-like overtones (not from actual grapes).

The common ways that brewers screw this up in my very small experience (Drinking only American versions) either seems to be by trying to make them too bold with extra hops or malts, turning them into some sort of fruit drink by adding lots of actual fruit (beer that happens to have a mild fruit-like taste from itís ingredients is different from actual fruit in beer that overwhelms the beer), or by brewing them so that they are absolutely indistinguishable from a light pale adjunct lager.

Itís like they think "Whoa, craft beer, better pour in the hops or up the malt or weíre doing it wrong" or "Summer/chick beer, better pour in some fruit" or "Not supposed to have a strong taste? Letís make a Bud Light clone and no one will know the difference".

I donít think many American craft brewers have a clear reason for making Kolschs except that itís a traditional style people have heard of, and they seem to be very reluctant to brew to the actual style.

Iíve heard complaints that a lot of the traditional German beers are intimidating American macros- i.e. that itís hard to get an Oktoberfest at Oktoberfest in Germany that resembles the style as it used to be brewed in Germany and is currently brewed in the United States. However, I wonder if the Kolschs are an example of where it hasnít changed and Americans simply donít understand the style very well, or arenít interested in it because theyíve embraced the wider world of beer styles of a result of not liking pale adjunct lagers and that anything thatís not very flavorful and has a refreshing profile will seem "wrong" or too much like a "non-craft" brew to them.

Just a few thoughts from someone who admittedly has only had a few Kolschs, and none from Germany.
5/6/2013 5:20:30 PM

Private message send the author a private message


premium
KyotoLefty 6447:476
or∑di∑nar∑y
/íŰrdn?ere/
Adjective
With no special or distinctive features; normal.


It seems quite mistaken to me to say across the board that German beers have "no special or distinctive features." Actually, I simply canít understand that statement.

Seems to me like this whole thread is about "US craft beers rock and the old world sucks." Kinda weird, though not surprising on this site.

5/6/2013 6:52:04 PM

Private message send the author a private message


premium
CLevar 376:10
Originally posted by KyotoLefty
or∑di∑nar∑y
/íŰrdn?ere/
Adjective
With no special or distinctive features; normal.


It seems quite mistaken to me to say across the board that German beers have "no special or distinctive features." Actually, I simply canít understand that statement.

Seems to me like this whole thread is about "US craft beers rock and the old world sucks." Kinda weird, though not surprising on this site.




ISO: .rar Cantillon.
5/6/2013 7:07:13 PM

Private message send the author a private message


Unclerudy 12:3
Any beer that you buy by the meter horizontally is meant to be drank in large quantities. Kiln is cool place to visit, especially around karnival, but the beer is nothing to get excited about. The real draw is the well prepared Himmel in Aard. Best meal to have either or aftedrinking kolsch.
5/6/2013 7:17:23 PM

Private message send the author a private message

Home > Forums > Beer Talk

Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13
Copyright © 2000-2014,
RateBeer LLC. All rights
reserved.
about us
About RateBeer
FAQ
Contact/Feedback
New Beers
add
Advanced Search
Add A Beer
Add A Brewer
Add A Place
Events
membership
Log In
Edit Personal Info
Buy Premium Membership
Your Messages
the best
RateBeer Best
100 Beer Club
The Top 50