RateBeer
home Home > Forums >
Homebrew | Beer Talk | Site News | Beer Trade | Beer Travel | Food/Beer | For Sale | New Here | Non-US | Industry | OT - Lite | OT - Medium

Brewing Books


read 613 times • 18 replies • posted 12/16/2013 8:22:04 PM

Page 1 | 2

OldSock
The Flavor Bible is a good one if you are interested in brewing beers with unique flavor combinations.



I probably turn to Radical Brewing the most, just so many interesting ideas. Oxford Companion isn’t perfect, but it has a little blurb about almost everything beer-related written by a selection of great brewers/writers.



I tend to enjoy the books that are more about the process/ingredients/science rather than the culture, history etc.
12/18/2013 5:54:12 AM

Post a reply Post reply

Private message send the author a private message


premium
pellegjr 395:16
Originally posted by OldSock
The Flavor Bible is a good one if you are interested in brewing beers with unique flavor combinations.


I can’t tell you how many times this resource has come in handy when I’m formulating more conceptual recipes.
12/18/2013 4:09:35 PM

Post a reply Post reply

Private message send the author a private message


premium
whaleman 2178:25
Originally posted by bitbucket

Brew Like a Monk



Check out the cover of that book. I acquired that glass from the brewery manager of Rochefort and smuggled it to Stan in New Mexico. It’s a Rochefort goblet turned 180 degrees to obscure exactly which monastery it came from.

12/18/2013 4:20:18 PM

Post a reply Post reply

Private message send the author a private message


premium
pellegjr 395:16
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by bitbucket
The Art of Making Wine


If more beer brewers would think like good winemakers, we’d have a LOT better beer on the market.


What are some of the skills/perspectives/processes that can be gleaned from the winemaking process to improve the brewing process?
12/18/2013 4:37:27 PM

Post a reply Post reply

Private message send the author a private message


CLevar 377:10
Originally posted by pellegjr
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by bitbucket
The Art of Making Wine


If more beer brewers would think like good winemakers, we’d have a LOT better beer on the market.


What are some of the skills/perspectives/processes that can be gleaned from the winemaking process to improve the brewing process?


Prepare for a diatribe on hornydevil’s own interpretation of "terroir"...
12/18/2013 5:44:30 PM

Post a reply Post reply

Private message send the author a private message


premium
pellegjr 395:16
Originally posted by CLevar
Originally posted by pellegjr
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by bitbucket
The Art of Making Wine


If more beer brewers would think like good winemakers, we’d have a LOT better beer on the market.


What are some of the skills/perspectives/processes that can be gleaned from the winemaking process to improve the brewing process?


Prepare for a diatribe on hornydevil’s own interpretation of "terroir"...


Inconceivable!
12/18/2013 5:49:18 PM

Post a reply Post reply

Private message send the author a private message


premium
bitbucket 2159:63
Originally posted by whaleman
Originally posted by bitbucket

Brew Like a Monk



Check out the cover of that book. I acquired that glass from the brewery manager of Rochefort and smuggled it to Stan in New Mexico. It’s a Rochefort goblet turned 180 degrees to obscure exactly which monastery it came from.



Nice!
12/18/2013 6:06:31 PM

Post a reply Post reply

Private message send the author a private message


HornyDevil
Originally posted by pellegjr
Originally posted by CLevar
Originally posted by pellegjr
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by bitbucket
The Art of Making Wine


If more beer brewers would think like good winemakers, we’d have a LOT better beer on the market.


What are some of the skills/perspectives/processes that can be gleaned from the winemaking process to improve the brewing process?


Prepare for a diatribe on hornydevil’s own interpretation of "terroir"...


Inconceivable!


It’s pretty simple, actually. Wine has essentially two ingredients, grapes and yeast. Beer has four. If beer brewers paid as much attention to the malt, hops, and water and how they are used as winemakers do to their grapes, beer would be universally better.

/diatribe

I could expound upon this, but I don’t find any need to do so unless someone wants me to.
12/19/2013 3:40:17 AM

Post a reply Post reply

Private message send the author a private message

Home > Forums > Homebrew

Reply to Thread     
Page 1 | 2

Homebrew Shops - A collection of homebrew shops and supply houses submitted by RateBeer readers

Homebrewing Articles - RateBeer Magazine's homebrewing department

Homebrew Recipes - Experiment, share and post your own homebrew recipes

Until we can make beer come out of your monitor...

Beer2Buds
Send Beer Over The Net

Free signup now. Even out a trade, keep good vibes alive, say hi with a beer

Copyright © 2000-2014,
RateBeer LLC. All rights
reserved.
about us
About RateBeer
FAQ
Contact/Feedback
New Beers
add
Advanced Search
Add A Beer
Add A Brewer
Add A Place
Events
membership
Log In
Edit Personal Info
Buy Premium Membership
Your Messages
the best
RateBeer Best
100 Beer Club
The Top 50