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Corned Beef


read 2195 times • 30 replies • posted 10/1/2012 1:44:09 PM

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bhops 428:37
ISO
10/1/2012 4:55:06 PM

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egajdzis 5336:47
Iíve got a 5.5 lb brisket corning this week. Going to rub it and smoke a pastrami this weekend.
10/2/2012 8:12:54 AM

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CharmCityCrab 150:
Put the potatoes in first, possibly with some whole mushrooms, and season them with vinegar. Then put the corn beef *on top* of the potatoes with the spices ground in, and pour on some vinegar, cayanne pepper, and worchiere sauce. Then add a cup of water to keep it moist and turn the crockpot on.

Add more water as itís going if it looks like itís needed. Cabbage goes in last- like 1/2 hour beforehand.

The reason you go with the potatoes on the bottom of the beef, is that they get cooked in the corn beefís juices. Delicious.
10/2/2012 12:34:33 PM

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JK 4433:283
Originally posted by CharmCityCrab
Put the potatoes in first, possibly with some whole mushrooms, and season them with vinegar. Then put the corn beef *on top* of the potatoes with the spices ground in, and pour on some vinegar, cayanne pepper, and worchiere sauce. Then add a cup of water to keep it moist and turn the crockpot on.

Add more water as itís going if it looks like itís needed. Cabbage goes in last- like 1/2 hour beforehand.

The reason you go with the potatoes on the bottom of the beef, is that they get cooked in the corn beefís juices. Delicious.


cook the potatoes for six to seven hours?
10/2/2012 12:35:55 PM

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CharmCityCrab 150:
"Cabbage goes in last- like 1/2 hour beforehand. "

Before taking it out, I mean.

You can also add some baby carrots to the potatoes and mushrooms before you turn it on if you like carrots.
10/2/2012 12:36:07 PM

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CharmCityCrab 150:
Originally posted by JK
cook the potatoes for six to seven hours?


I turn my slow cooker on high, so itís more like 3-4 hours if that, and the potatoes come out fine that way. Youíre right that on low there is a chance they might come out like mush, but it could be worth a try.
10/2/2012 12:37:56 PM

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CharmCityCrab 150:
Originally posted by CharmCityCrabcayenne pepper


Thatís cayenne pepper *sauce*, not whole cayenne peppers. Although whole cayanne peppers might work, too, never tried it that way. The mix of that with sweet vinegar, a little worcheire, and slow cooked corn beef- yum.
10/2/2012 12:44:13 PM

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pepsican 1445:46
Since the meat is already very tender/mushy, Iíd want the potatoes to counter that. The potatoes used in this dish would be perfect:

http://www.forumgastronomic.com/css/image/ADRIA-1.PDF
10/2/2012 12:45:45 PM

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crosamich 431:17
Originally posted by Billicus
Also too... you can only cook Corned beef if youíre Irish if your not, Forget about it!

I will have to call you on that. speaking from personal experience (I lived there) the Irish eat a fair amount of corned beef from the deli but not that much corned beef, carrot, potato, cabbage like it is done here...at least down in Cork anyway.
10/2/2012 5:33:45 PM

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CharmCityCrab 150:
Originally posted by crosamich
I will have to call you on that. speaking from personal experience (I lived there) the Irish eat a fair amount of corned beef from the deli but not that much corned beef, carrot, potato, cabbage like it is done here...at least down in Cork anyway.


Corned beef is a traditional thing for Irish-*Americans*. A lot of folks in the US, including many Americans of Irish ancestry, just assume that it was a tradition brought over from Ireland, and thus is traditional there as well, but it isnít.

Apparently, at least at the time most Irish immigrated to the US (in the 19th century), bacon used to be popular in Ireland. Only, it wasnít bacon the way we in the US think of it- little strips- it was this huge block of meat that kind of resembled, well, corned beef, that wasnít available that way in the US. Meanwhile, corned beef was just about the cheapest meat you could buy in the US at the time, and Irish immigrants initially were generally pretty impoverished financially, so it became popular in the US Irish immigrant communities to boil some corned beef along with one of the cheapest vegetables available in the US at the time- cabbage.

Additionally, I had heard that the Jewish communities, often in the same areas, played a role in introduced the new Irish immigrants to corned beef, but I donít know if that part is history or urban legend.
10/3/2012 8:51:57 AM

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