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dropping yeast with pressure

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johntreeter
beers 126 º places 7 º 18:06 Sat 5/8/2010

I have no real way to drop my yeast in the warmer months at this time and have heard of dropping it with preasure. Anyone with a tried and true method, Iíd love to hear it. Thanks,
John

 
absolutesites
beers 2 º 06:24 Sun 5/9/2010

Originally posted by johntreeter
I have no real way to drop my yeast in the warmer months at this time and have heard of dropping it with preasure. Anyone with a tried and true method, Iíd love to hear it. Thanks,


Iíve heard something about some larger breweries using a high pressure yeast to mature beer more quickly, but as far as using higher pressures to clear a beer, I have not heard of it.

Much easier to drop the temperature and/or use finings, donít you think?

 
notlob
07:32 Sun 5/9/2010

How were you even planning on adding pressure anyways? In a keg but just out of the keggerator?

From what I understand, only temperature and time can clear most particulates, including those little unflocculating yeasties. This is aided with finings. Adding pressure will stress the yeast out by actually squeezing their cell walls. It may force them to go dormant and flocculate out. If fermentation is not over, it may affect the yeastís ability to clean up the beer if you do it too soon. I hope you donít plan on doing this in a glass carboy.

 
johntreeter
beers 126 º places 7 º 13:15 Sun 5/9/2010

I had planned on using a corni for a secondary and after about a week putting preasure on (although a carboy might make for a good show). With my fridge out and no plans in the next few months to replace it, I was looking for options for my tradtionalist mindset other than finings.

 
notlob
17:04 Sun 5/9/2010

Originally posted by johntreeter
I had planned on using a corni for a secondary and after about a week putting preasure on (although a carboy might make for a good show). With my fridge out and no plans in the next few months to replace it, I was looking for options for my tradtionalist mindset other than finings.

Funny thing is I think itís more traditional to use finings than pressure (assuming pressure will work, which Iím skeptical about). Since you canít consume it anyways without a fridge, just give it time and the yeast will settle out.

 
TheBeerSommelier
premium
17:21 Sun 5/9/2010


Why not use gelatin?

 
erway
beers 1004 º places 41 º 20:19 Sun 5/9/2010

Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier

Why not use gelatin?


Gelatin is a terrible fining agent (it strips out much more than just yeast and protein-tannin complexes) and only works well at cold temperatures, much like isinglass.

Biofine clear is magic. I could have an IPA out of the fermenter in 12 days and have it on tap, looking filtered (yes, it actually was as bright as any filtered beer) on the 14th day with ~ 50mls/bbl. of biofine clear dosed in line.

If I weíre doing this at home, I would toss about 10 mls into a corny with the last 1" cut off of the dip tube and fill the corny with beer. As it fills, ever so lightly swirl the keg intermittently (hopefully this is closed and under pressure) and let it sit. It will work far faster at 32-40 F, but it will work at room temp. Give it about 1 week and you should have a clear beer.

 
notlob
06:01 Mon 5/10/2010

Originally posted by erway
Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier

Why not use gelatin?


Gelatin is a terrible fining agent (it strips out much more than just yeast and protein-tannin complexes) and only works well at cold temperatures, much like isinglass.

Biofine clear is magic. I could have an IPA out of the fermenter in 12 days and have it on tap, looking filtered (yes, it actually was as bright as any filtered beer) on the 14th day with ~ 50mls/bbl. of biofine clear dosed in line.

If I weíre doing this at home, I would toss about 10 mls into a corny with the last 1" cut off of the dip tube and fill the corny with beer. As it fills, ever so lightly swirl the keg intermittently (hopefully this is closed and under pressure) and let it sit. It will work far faster at 32-40 F, but it will work at room temp. Give it about 1 week and you should have a clear beer.


Iím trying to figure out the difference between Biofine and gelatin. Both are forms of collagen. The brewing-solutions website says that Biofine is a "purified form of [isinglass]," which is a purer form of collagen than gelatin. From what I understand, all of these collagens can strip out more than just yeast and those protein that cause chill haze if you use too much. Like you I can get a really clear beer in about a week, and I havenít noticed anything Iíd consider negative.

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