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Dry hopping: do I purge with CO2?


read 2442 times • 19 replies • posted 8/5/2012 12:18:13 PM

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Erlangernick 1:2
Originally posted by sharpe1987
Last question (maybe). As I said before, Iím dry hopping in the primary. Should I shake the carboy a bit to get the newly added hops into solution better and stir up the crud on the bottom? Or just drop them
In and let it go?


Do your primary in a 10-gal stainless kettle with good-fitting lid and you can stir and otherwise have convenient access to your wort. Cleanup and sanitation are a breeze, too.
8/7/2012 12:39:47 AM

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Erlangernick 1:2
Originally posted by SamGamgee
...timing of dryhopping in primary...


Interesting stuff Iíd never thought about, being a layman.

But what about when your primary is only 2 days, not 5 or more? I suppose I could try adding some at 12 hours (beginning of Kršusen) and again at 36 hours.

Hmmm...
8/7/2012 12:42:07 AM

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sharpe1987 8:
Originally posted by Erlangernick
Originally posted by sharpe1987
Last question (maybe). As I said before, Iím dry hopping in the primary. Should I shake the carboy a bit to get the newly added hops into solution better and stir up the crud on the bottom? Or just drop them
In and let it go?


Do your primary in a 10-gal stainless kettle with good-fitting lid and you can stir and otherwise have convenient access to your wort. Cleanup and sanitation are a breeze, too.



I donít have any stainless pots with a good fitting lid, so Iím stuck with the carboy as my primary and cannot stir.

Still curious about whether it is a good idea to mix up the crud on the bottom again or let it be and just let the hops settle in slowly
8/7/2012 10:32:35 AM

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NobleSquirrel 3437:209
Originally posted by sharpe1987
Originally posted by Erlangernick
Originally posted by sharpe1987
Last question (maybe). As I said before, Iím dry hopping in the primary. Should I shake the carboy a bit to get the newly added hops into solution better and stir up the crud on the bottom? Or just drop them
In and let it go?


Do your primary in a 10-gal stainless kettle with good-fitting lid and you can stir and otherwise have convenient access to your wort. Cleanup and sanitation are a breeze, too.



I donít have any stainless pots with a good fitting lid, so Iím stuck with the carboy as my primary and cannot stir.

Still curious about whether it is a good idea to mix up the crud on the bottom again or let it be and just let the hops settle in slowly


The crud in the bottom will end up mudding the dry hop flavor. Iíve never had an issue just throwing them in. The aroma comes out fine. Great thing about homebrewing is you can try different things with different batches.
8/7/2012 11:39:58 AM

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robrules 1
Originally posted by NobleSquirrel
Great thing about homebrewing is you can try different things with different batches.


Really? I got the impression (from homebrew forums like these)that homebrewers only brew one batch in their lifetime and HAVE to make sure it comes out right - and when it doesnít, its a life and death situation to fix it.

8/7/2012 12:11:51 PM

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SamGamgee 2452:182
Originally posted by Erlangernick
Originally posted by SamGamgee
And as far as sierra nevada goes (donít know if what you said about them is true and have never heard that myself), they use whole hops and dry hop by recirculating beer through a small vessel called a "torpedo" which allows them to get good extraction of hop oils in a smaller amount of time via mechanical action.

On a large scale, itís very hard to steep with whole hops because it takes much longer and itís hard to get good contact with the beer if they are in hop bags, which is what they used to do. Thatís why the overwhelming majority of breweries use pellets for dry hopping. you just add them to the top of the tank and most settle in the cone within several days and can be dumped off the bottom. Since the lupulin glands have been mostly ruptured during the pelletizing process, maximum oil extraction can occur in under a day and you donít really get much from having them in for more that 3 or so days anyway (at ale fermentation temps anyway, colder temps means longer extraction times).


Repeating an age-old question: But doesnít pelletising also destroy some aroma? Use more to compensate?


The way they are done now (kept cold during the process) I donít know if there is any significant loss of aroma. And your utilization is generally higher with pellets because they have been broken up. If anything, I would think whole hops would be less efficient. They definitely are in the kettle.

8/7/2012 7:17:56 PM

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SamGamgee 2452:182
Originally posted by Erlangernick
Originally posted by SamGamgee
...timing of dryhopping in primary...


Interesting stuff Iíd never thought about, being a layman.

But what about when your primary is only 2 days, not 5 or more? I suppose I could try adding some at 12 hours (beginning of Kršusen) and again at 36 hours.

Hmmm...


Iíd wait until the last day of active fermentation. If you add them before high kršusen, youíre going to lose a large amount of the oil to the yeast and fermentation activity.

Apparently fermentation hopping can give you some cool flavors but is just really inefficient to very uncommon.
8/7/2012 7:19:58 PM

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jgauquie 33:
Not to sound like a jerk, but when you are on a tight fiscal budget everyone should be more concerned about wasting what they paid good money for.
Originally posted by robrules
Originally posted by NobleSquirrel
Great thing about homebrewing is you can try different things with different batches.


Really? I got the impression (from homebrew forums like these)that homebrewers only brew one batch in their lifetime and HAVE to make sure it comes out right - and when it doesnít, its a life and death situation to fix it.


8/9/2012 5:10:45 PM

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SpringsLicker 3132:131
Originally posted by SamGamgee
Originally posted by Erlangernick
Originally posted by SamGamgee
And as far as sierra nevada goes (donít know if what you said about them is true and have never heard that myself), they use whole hops and dry hop by recirculating beer through a small vessel called a "torpedo" which allows them to get good extraction of hop oils in a smaller amount of time via mechanical action.

On a large scale, itís very hard to steep with whole hops because it takes much longer and itís hard to get good contact with the beer if they are in hop bags, which is what they used to do. Thatís why the overwhelming majority of breweries use pellets for dry hopping. you just add them to the top of the tank and most settle in the cone within several days and can be dumped off the bottom. Since the lupulin glands have been mostly ruptured during the pelletizing process, maximum oil extraction can occur in under a day and you donít really get much from having them in for more that 3 or so days anyway (at ale fermentation temps anyway, colder temps means longer extraction times).


Repeating an age-old question: But doesnít pelletising also destroy some aroma? Use more to compensate?


The way they are done now (kept cold during the process) I donít know if there is any significant loss of aroma. And your utilization is generally higher with pellets because they have been broken up. If anything, I would think whole hops would be less efficient. They definitely are in the kettle.




They are way less efficient in my experience but far superior in aroma and especially flavor as there is less chlorophyll flavor. They also absorb a lot of beer. But you just get the Lupulin and not all of the plant matter flavors.
8/9/2012 5:30:33 PM

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