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Duvel goes with pesto


read 1882 times • 28 replies • posted 6/20/2013 10:45:50 AM

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pinkie 470:10
I tried duvel for the first time this week and I was amazed at itís dryness, itís sparkling qualities, light flavor and itís versatility in food pairing. I am having it today with pesto. Hereís how easy it is to make pesto.


All you need is one of those small food processors. I have the smallest there is. Itís the black and decker mini chopper. Into that with as much minced garlic as you are going to use. My pesto may as well be called garlic pesto because I like it robust. Then from your fresh basil plant start filling up the chopper with the shredded basil leaves. About a hand full, literally use the palm of your hand, of chopped walnuts. (Pine nuts if you can afford them) Donít put in too many nuts because it will be too thick. You can add more if you want but you canít take them out. Hand full of parmesan cheese, fresh or kraft. Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste. Drizzle over some olive oil and start to pulse. Keep pulsing the chopper, adding more oil and tasting until you have everything just right. Should be smooth and not at all thick or chunky.


Thatís it. You can freeze pesto and it keeps a long time or refrigerate for up to 10 days. Fresh and delicious; itís as elegant or as down to earth as you like and I think it would pair well with duvel.


=)

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Countbeer 4561:204
Was a long time ago, but last weekend I had a wedding and after exploring the beers they had I choose to go with Duvel. Didnít let me down. Had a 4 course dinner starting with soup and than cold food (like salad, cold meat and fruit and fish mixings) and than the main course with about a dozen and a half different meats and vegetables to choose from. The Duvel fitted every course very well and before I knew it I had almost emptied half a crate... One of the few "macro" beers thatís always good!
6/20/2013 1:03:05 PM

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harrisoni 13897:22
Duvel was one of my first cross over beers and especially into Belgium. I adore the Duvel glass, it is still my go to glass for a 33cl bottle. I love my Duvel glass.

And a 75cl bottle of Duvel is still a lovely beer. Goes so well with so many foods. Itís a staple mealtime table top beer.
6/20/2013 1:06:28 PM

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tennisjoel 1180:32
All this talking of Duvel makes me think I should pick one up sometime. I havenít had it in years.
6/20/2013 1:20:24 PM

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graziano85 318:14
Originally posted by pinkie
I tried duvel for the first time this week and I was amazed at itís dryness, itís sparkling qualities, light flavor and itís versatility in food pairing. I am having it today with pesto. Hereís how easy it is to make pesto.


All you need is one of those small food processors. I have the smallest there is. Itís the black and decker mini chopper. Into that with as much minced garlic as you are going to use. My pesto may as well be called garlic pesto because I like it robust. Then from your fresh basil plant start filling up the chopper with the shredded basil leaves. About a hand full, literally use the palm of your hand, of chopped walnuts. (Pine nuts if you can afford them) Donít put in too many nuts because it will be too thick. You can add more if you want but you canít take them out. Hand full of parmesan cheese, fresh or kraft. Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste. Drizzle over some olive oil and start to pulse. Keep pulsing the chopper, adding more oil and tasting until you have everything just right. Should be smooth and not at all thick or chunky.


Thatís it. You can freeze pesto and it keeps a long time or refrigerate for up to 10 days. Fresh and delicious; itís as elegant or as down to earth as you like and I think it would pair well with duvel.


=)




Sorry, I have to do some corrections

1) The real pesto is not made with a food processor, but with "mortaio" and "pestello", these:
http://mealsfromscratch.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/PESTO.jpg

The word pesto comes from the verb "pestare", that is the action to do it, pestle, pound. Itís making a different consistence than the electric mixer.
Of course, if you donít have it, you must use the processor

2) Very important, parmesan is something very bad and untasty that they invented abroad, in Italy it doesnít exist ANYWHERE...for pesto only "Parmigiano Reggiano" or in alternative "Grana Padano" (very similar), they have NOTHING to do with parmesan...I donít know in USA, but in Europe in some other nations you can find it, itís not easy and itís more expensive, but it worths it (but I have to say itís a young one respect what you can buy only in Italy, that is usually 24/36 months old! thatís really heavy and tasty! the real one)
And in the real recipe there is also a small part (about 30/40% of the Parmigiano quantity) of "Pecorino", a famous italian sheep cheese.

3) You wrote olive oil...thatís not enough, it must be "extra-virgin olive oil"...if itís written only "olive oil" it is a lower quality oil, and in Italy almost no one use it.

For the rest, I would say itís ok

If anyone is interested, here is the link to the recipe...itís probably the most famous italian food blog, and as you can see, there is also the video in English

http://ricette.giallozafferano.it/Pesto-alla-Genovese.html

And now I would drink a Duvel ahah
6/20/2013 3:44:24 PM

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FL_homer 1:1
Duvel is also great with raw oysters.
6/22/2013 3:30:56 AM

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drowland 6100:172
Originally posted by graziano85
Originally posted by pinkie
I tried duvel for the first time this week and I was amazed at itís dryness, itís sparkling qualities, light flavor and itís versatility in food pairing. I am having it today with pesto. Hereís how easy it is to make pesto.


All you need is one of those small food processors. I have the smallest there is. Itís the black and decker mini chopper. Into that with as much minced garlic as you are going to use. My pesto may as well be called garlic pesto because I like it robust. Then from your fresh basil plant start filling up the chopper with the shredded basil leaves. About a hand full, literally use the palm of your hand, of chopped walnuts. (Pine nuts if you can afford them) Donít put in too many nuts because it will be too thick. You can add more if you want but you canít take them out. Hand full of parmesan cheese, fresh or kraft. Salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste. Drizzle over some olive oil and start to pulse. Keep pulsing the chopper, adding more oil and tasting until you have everything just right. Should be smooth and not at all thick or chunky.


Thatís it. You can freeze pesto and it keeps a long time or refrigerate for up to 10 days. Fresh and delicious; itís as elegant or as down to earth as you like and I think it would pair well with duvel.


=)




Sorry, I have to do some corrections

1) The real pesto is not made with a food processor, but with "mortaio" and "pestello", these:
http://mealsfromscratch.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/PESTO.jpg

The word pesto comes from the verb "pestare", that is the action to do it, pestle, pound. Itís making a different consistence than the electric mixer.
Of course, if you donít have it, you must use the processor

2) Very important, parmesan is something very bad and untasty that they invented abroad, in Italy it doesnít exist ANYWHERE...for pesto only "Parmigiano Reggiano" or in alternative "Grana Padano" (very similar), they have NOTHING to do with parmesan...I donít know in USA, but in Europe in some other nations you can find it, itís not easy and itís more expensive, but it worths it (but I have to say itís a young one respect what you can buy only in Italy, that is usually 24/36 months old! thatís really heavy and tasty! the real one)
And in the real recipe there is also a small part (about 30/40% of the Parmigiano quantity) of "Pecorino", a famous italian sheep cheese.

3) You wrote olive oil...thatís not enough, it must be "extra-virgin olive oil"...if itís written only "olive oil" it is a lower quality oil, and in Italy almost no one use it.

For the rest, I would say itís ok

If anyone is interested, here is the link to the recipe...itís probably the most famous italian food blog, and as you can see, there is also the video in English

http://ricette.giallozafferano.it/Pesto-alla-Genovese.html

And now I would drink a Duvel ahah


Parmesan Reggiano is easy to find in the US in my experience. We have it where I work, a few feet from me right now. Unless Iím mistaken and itís some "version" of it that is similar.
6/22/2013 11:23:06 AM

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SamGamgee 2452:182
I just made pesto last night. Didnít have Duvel though. We had a bottle of AlbariŮo from a local Edna Valley winery, which was also a nice pairing.

I make a vegan version that uses some nutritional yeast in place of cheese. I toast the walnuts at 350 in the oven for ten minutes which brings a nice earthy flavor to the pesto. Used to use pine nuts but We always have walnuts in the freezer so I just go with them these days. Iíve used almonds as well, which give the pesto a really bright green color.
6/22/2013 1:07:45 PM

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graziano85 318:14

Parmesan Reggiano is easy to find in the US in my experience. We have it where I work, a few feet from me right now. Unless Iím mistaken and itís some "version" of it that is similar.


As I said, the original is ONLY "Parmigiano Reggiano"...if what you found is "Parmesan Reggiano" as you wrote, itís a fake, totally different from the original any "parmesan" is produced in Italy.

http://www.cooperatori.it/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Logo-Parmigiano-Reggiano.jpg

If you want, you can read here (I read it, they translated well from the italian page, but they forgot some details):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parmigiano-Reggiano

In addition, I can say that only in Italy you can find the kind of Parmigiano made with "Reggiana Rossa" milk, a traditionl italian cow breed, that once was the only one used, but nowadays is more rare...its milk has a higher content of proteins, casein and calcium, and the quality is much higher, so the price is a bit higher too (but this cow produces only half of the milk of other breeds, so...thatís the world today, unfortunately) :)

Another important detail, "cows have to be fed only on grass or hay"...any flours or other shit!

The aging must be minimum 18 months long (itís the cheapest), and it has very strictly rules and quality controls, but a good one, in my opinion, at least 24 months, 36 is very good, and there are some special productions (quite small and rare) that can reach 72 or even 90 months long!

Just a last detail: to produce a 38 kg cheese (this is the average size), they use about 550 liters milk...about 15 liters for each kilogram!

And very important:
"Outside Europe, commercially produced imitation cheeses may be legally sold under the generic name Parmesan, although there are substantial differences in terms of quality, taste and nutritional components. "


6/22/2013 2:50:58 PM

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StefanSD 2163:45
Originally posted by graziano85

Parmigiano Reggiano is easy to find in the US in my experience. We have it where I work, a few feet from me right now. Unless Iím mistaken and itís some "version" of it that is similar.


As I said, the original is ONLY "Parmigiano Reggiano"...if what you found is "Parmesan Reggiano" as you wrote, itís a fake, totally different from the original any "parmesan" is produced in Italy.

http://www.cooperatori.it/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Logo-Parmigiano-Reggiano.jpg

If you want, you can read here (I read it, they translated well from the italian page, but they forgot some details):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parmigiano-Reggiano

In addition, I can say that only in Italy you can find the kind of Parmigiano made with "Reggiana Rossa" milk, a traditionl italian cow breed, that once was the only one used, but nowadays is more rare...its milk has a higher content of proteins, casein and calcium, and the quality is much higher, so the price is a bit higher too (but this cow produces only half of the milk of other breeds, so...thatís the world today, unfortunately) :)

Another important detail, "cows have to be fed only on grass or hay"...any flours or other shit!

The aging must be minimum 18 months long (itís the cheapest), and it has very strictly rules and quality controls, but a good one, in my opinion, at least 24 months, 36 is very good, and there are some special productions (quite small and rare) that can reach 72 or even 90 months long!

Just a last detail: to produce a 38 kg cheese (this is the average size), they use about 550 liters milk...about 15 liters for each kilogram!

And very important:
"Outside Europe, commercially produced imitation cheeses may be legally sold under the generic name Parmesan, although there are substantial differences in terms of quality, taste and nutritional components. "





Parmesan Reggiano which says on the label "Imported from Italy" and "Product of Italy" is widely available in the US. Same for imported Pecorino, Grana Padano and many other fine Italian cheeses. If these are fakes then the fakes are originating in Italy.

US made Parmesan cheeses are sold as such and there is no confusing them with the originals.
6/22/2013 4:02:16 PM

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SamGamgee 2452:182
I think that for the US market, they just change the name to what is familiar to people here.
6/22/2013 6:07:57 PM

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