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Duvel goes with pesto


read 1698 times • 28 replies • posted 6/20/2013 10:45:50 AM

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graziano85 286:14
Parmesan Reggiano which says on the label "Imported from Italy" and "Product of Italy" is widely available in the US. Same for imported Pecorino, Grana Padano and many other fine Italian cheeses. If these are fakes then the fakes are originating in Italy.

US made Parmesan cheeses are sold as such and there is no confusing them with the originals.


As Sam said after, maybe they changed the name to something that sounds familiar in USA, I cannot say no because I was never in USA and so I never saw this product that you talk about :)

But since in the last 3 years I lived and worked in 3 different european countries, I realized that there are many italian products that I can find abroad, produced in Italy, that they have a lower quality than other products you can find in Italy.

Unfortunately, since Iím italian and I know how many italians think, they think to be smarter than the others and they try to cheat foreigners if possible (not all, of course, luckily, but there are many)
So there are also many italian food factories producing not really good things, and they sell them only abroad. So there is to pay attention also to this, unfortunately.

But if that "Parmesan Reggiano" comes from the same place that the real one, from the same Consortium, it should be ok
But I still have some doubts (many!), since in the last years they fight a lot to defend their name, so it sounds strange to me they change the label name just to make it easier to read and say, also because I donít think that Parmigiano is such a difficult name to read and say, even for americans :) and also because they ABSOLUTELY donít want to be misunderstood with the others fake.

A tip: to be sure that is the right one, on the crust it must have written "Parmigiano Reggiano" (maybe, but I cannot believe, they can change the name on the package, but I repeat, I have big doubts also on this, but on the crust no, absolutely they donít write parmesan)...in this way, and with the same font, absolutely:

http://www.serapea.it/images/ParmigianoForma.jpg

And on the label, they must write the Consortium name, the name of the dairy where itís made (and must be a dairy that is part of the official Consortium) and it can come only from the provinces of Parma (PR), Reggio Emilia (RE), Modena (MO), Mantova (MN) and Bologna (BO)...If what you buy comes from different provinces or even regions, it is a 100% fake made only for the market abroad, and a totally different cheese, of much lower quality.

And again, on the real Parmigiano Reggiano label, ALL these data MUST be written.

For the ones who are interested, here, on their official website, there are 5 very interesting PDF (not only in italian, but there are also in ENGLISH, good for you ahah), where are written the name of ALL the official dairies and ALL the other details, so you can see if what you buy is a real or a fake Parmigiano Reggiano:

http://www.parmigianoreggiano.com/where/guided_tours_dairies/default.aspx

I know, itís a lot of pages, but itís very interesting, and itís the only way to understand if they are cheating you or not

I hope all these words I wrote they will be useful at least to some of you! Iím proud to be italian and of the italian food, and I want that also who is not italian can appreciate the REAL italian products :) it makes me happy everytime I can show to my not italian friends the real italian food, and to see their amazed faces when they realize the difference :D itís like if they would discover a new world some times ahah

So read these words as a help.
6/23/2013 1:45:14 AM

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CheesedMan 555:12
As someone who works in the industry, I can tell you that Parmigiano Reggiano is readily available, and is in fact, one of the most easily obtained Italian cheeses in the US. The word Parmesan is commonly used in the United States, which where your issue seems to be arising from. However, even the Consorzio del Formaggio ParmigianoĖReggiano has adopted this nomenclature as evidenced by this website.

Interestingly, I find Fiore Sardo to be a better choice when making pesto, and since I love both pesto and Duvel, I now know what is for lunch today.
6/23/2013 5:23:06 AM

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pinkie 457:10
Everybody gonna kook-a today! Awesome!
6/23/2013 5:55:14 AM

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drowland 5980:172
Originally posted by graziano85

Parmesan Reggiano is easy to find in the US in my experience. We have it where I work, a few feet from me right now. Unless Iím mistaken and itís some "version" of it that is similar.


As I said, the original is ONLY "Parmigiano Reggiano"...if what you found is "Parmesan Reggiano" as you wrote, itís a fake, totally different from the original any "parmesan" is produced in Italy.

http://www.cooperatori.it/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Logo-Parmigiano-Reggiano.jpg

If you want, you can read here (I read it, they translated well from the italian page, but they forgot some details):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parmigiano-Reggiano

In addition, I can say that only in Italy you can find the kind of Parmigiano made with "Reggiana Rossa" milk, a traditionl italian cow breed, that once was the only one used, but nowadays is more rare...its milk has a higher content of proteins, casein and calcium, and the quality is much higher, so the price is a bit higher too (but this cow produces only half of the milk of other breeds, so...thatís the world today, unfortunately) :)

Another important detail, "cows have to be fed only on grass or hay"...any flours or other shit!

The aging must be minimum 18 months long (itís the cheapest), and it has very strictly rules and quality controls, but a good one, in my opinion, at least 24 months, 36 is very good, and there are some special productions (quite small and rare) that can reach 72 or even 90 months long!

Just a last detail: to produce a 38 kg cheese (this is the average size), they use about 550 liters milk...about 15 liters for each kilogram!

And very important:
"Outside Europe, commercially produced imitation cheeses may be legally sold under the generic name Parmesan, although there are substantial differences in terms of quality, taste and nutritional components. "





I did not actually look at the label, I just generically typed parmesan. I will look later when I go next door, but as someone below said, Iím pretty sure itís legit.
6/23/2013 6:02:54 AM

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drowland 5980:172
Originally posted by CheesedMan
As someone who works in the industry, I can tell you that Parmigiano Reggiano is readily available, and is in fact, one of the most easily obtained Italian cheeses. The word Parmesan is commonly used in the United States, which where your issue seems to be arising from. However, even the Consorzio del Formaggio ParmigianoĖReggiano has adopted this nomenclature as evidenced by this website.

However, I find Fiore Sardo to be a better choice when making pesto, and since I love both pesto and Duvel, I now know what is for lunch today.




I was honestly hoping youíd chime in... was thinking of sending you a BM.

Making it up to Jax soon? You should come to my silly malt likka tasting!
6/23/2013 6:05:05 AM

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drowland 5980:172
Originally posted by drowland
Originally posted by CheesedMan
As someone who works in the industry, I can tell you that Parmigiano Reggiano is readily available, and is in fact, one of the most easily obtained Italian cheeses. The word Parmesan is commonly used in the United States, which where your issue seems to be arising from. However, even the Consorzio del Formaggio ParmigianoĖReggiano has adopted this nomenclature as evidenced by this website.

However, I find Fiore Sardo to be a better choice when making pesto, and since I love both pesto and Duvel, I now know what is for lunch today.




I was honestly hoping youíd chime in... was thinking of sending you a BM.

Making it up to Jax soon? You should come to my silly malt likka tasting!


...what cheese goes with malt likka? Velveeta?
6/23/2013 6:05:24 AM

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CheesedMan 555:12
Originally posted by drowland
Originally posted by drowland
Originally posted by CheesedMan
As someone who works in the industry, I can tell you that Parmigiano Reggiano is readily available, and is in fact, one of the most easily obtained Italian cheeses. The word Parmesan is commonly used in the United States, which where your issue seems to be arising from. However, even the Consorzio del Formaggio ParmigianoĖReggiano has adopted this nomenclature as evidenced by this website.

However, I find Fiore Sardo to be a better choice when making pesto, and since I love both pesto and Duvel, I now know what is for lunch today.




I was honestly hoping youíd chime in... was thinking of sending you a BM.

Making it up to Jax soon? You should come to my silly malt likka tasting!


...what cheese goes with malt likka? Velveeta?


CheeseWiz

And I actually might be able to make it to the Malt Likka tasting.
6/23/2013 6:11:01 AM

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graziano85 286:14
Originally posted by CheesedMan
As someone who works in the industry, I can tell you that Parmigiano Reggiano is readily available, and is in fact, one of the most easily obtained Italian cheeses. The word Parmesan is commonly used in the United States, which where your issue seems to be arising from. However, even the Consorzio del Formaggio ParmigianoĖReggiano has adopted this nomenclature as evidenced by this website.

However, I find Fiore Sardo to be a better choice when making pesto, and since I love both pesto and Duvel, I now know what is for lunch today.


Ok, it seems so :)

I didnít know that page, also because often in the italian media they said that the Consorzio fights a lot against these fakes.
Whatís matter, itís that in the end you buy the real one and not some fake :) thatís all, I wanted to make clear that, and pay attention to these fakes.

Drowland: always read the labels! thatís the first step to know what you eat! (hoping that your nation has good laws about it, I donít know)

PS: but why on the official website, in the english version I mean, they didnnít change the name?
http://www.parmigianoreggiano.com/

Just a curiosity, since you work in the industry :) thanks

6/23/2013 6:14:32 AM

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graziano85 286:14
Another thing: "Pecorino" is a generic word, in fact there is Pecorino Romano, Pecorino Toscano, Pecorino Sardo, Pecorino di Filiano, Pecorino Siciliano (these five are the DOP, "protected designation of origin"), and many others.
"Fiore Sardo", if I remember correctly it is a kind of Pecorino Sardo, and it depends from the taste of everyone, but usually every Pecorino is "allowed" in the original recipe of pesto.

Than everyone is free to do what he wants, obviously

Bon appetit :D
6/23/2013 6:32:00 AM

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CheesedMan 555:12
Originally posted by graziano85
Originally posted by CheesedMan
As someone who works in the industry, I can tell you that Parmigiano Reggiano is readily available, and is in fact, one of the most easily obtained Italian cheeses. The word Parmesan is commonly used in the United States, which where your issue seems to be arising from. However, even the Consorzio del Formaggio ParmigianoĖReggiano has adopted this nomenclature as evidenced by this website.

However, I find Fiore Sardo to be a better choice when making pesto, and since I love both pesto and Duvel, I now know what is for lunch today.


Ok, it seems so :)

I didnít know that page, also because often in the italian media they said that the Consorzio fights a lot against these fakes.
Whatís matter, itís that in the end you buy the real one and not some fake :) thatís all, I wanted to make clear that, and pay attention to these fakes.

Drowland: always read the labels! thatís the first step to know what you eat! (hoping that your nation has good laws about it, I donít know)

PS: but why on the official website, in the english version I mean, they didnnít change the name?
http://www.parmigianoreggiano.com/

Just a curiosity, since you work in the industry :) thanks




The link I posted is the site that was developed specifically for the US market and is maintained by the Consorzio, it is their official site for the American market. If you go to the site I linked, and look in the lower left quadrant, you will see this:

© 2012Ė2013 Consorzio del Formaggio ParmigianoĖReggiano


It is an embedded link to the their original site, so both sites in all actuality are official sites of the Consorzio del Formaggio ParmigianoĖReggiano. Different markets have require different marketing strategies, that is quite simply why they created a site specifically targeting the American market.
6/23/2013 6:35:39 AM

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