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Germany - brewers fear beer price war!


read 4865 times • 87 replies • posted 4/22/2013 2:56:30 PM

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Erlangernick 1:2
Originally posted by pivnizub
Originally posted by jonas
I think things are slowly changing in Germany though. I was very impressed with the amount of interesting German beers at the recent Braukunst Live festival in Munich. Both all the new microbrewers and the more established medium sized breweries were going absoutely nuts making IPAs, dryhopped, barrel aged beer sand all sorts of historic styles. Even Hofbršuhaus made a very nice festival special.
At one of the panel discussions it was mentioned that german brewers slowly are realizing they have to renew themselves to have a competitive product.

Jonas is absolutely right:
1.Things are changing here... It has absolutely nothing to do with the purity law. This Reinheitsgebot neither forces brewers to produce crappy beers nor prevents it them from brewing I.P.A.ís, Stouts or dry hopped Lagers.
2. To too many germans beers is only "simple food"; they love cheap foodstuff! Slogan: get more, pay less! So they buy the cheapest crate of crappy Lager, with or without the Gebot.... Here itís no problem to find people with the newest smart-phone, the hugest flat-screen TV and the biggest SUV, who are proud that they bought one chicken for two Euros!
Very, very well said.


3. Beer belongs in many parts of Germany (especially in Bavaria, Cologne and DŁsseldorf) to the daily life; it accompanies the meals and is consumed in larger quantities in company. Do You really think that Baltic Porters or Quadruples are suitable for that?
Good point.


4. For that reason nobody needs a Belgian Beer Shop in Germany.
Quatsch! I do! Well, not really, nearly all Belgian beers are too strong for me.


Many of the often overrated belgian beers are sweet, heavy, alcoholic and sticky. They would never be successful in a country of Lager lovers.
Good point: Germans like their beer clean and, well, lagered. Only in Franconia, and only SOME Franconian brewers make really flavourful lagers that approach ale-ish complexity.


If You really want to buy stuff from Belgium here, Youíll find the better examples in special shops (Orval, Westmalle, Chimay, Duvel, La Chouffe, Rochefort to name only a few...) without any problem.


What??? Where? Well, actually, the Kitzmann Bršukontor here near me has recently started carrying Orval, Westmalle, Rochefort, and even a few bottles of the sublime Hommelbier fresh-hop. In *Franconia*!
4/24/2013 11:30:43 PM

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Erlangernick 1:2
Originally posted by left_bank
i might be the only person on rb to say,but i love the taste of german bier and (as far as taste goes)i would not want them to change a thing!


?!?
4/24/2013 11:32:24 PM

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Erlangernick 1:2
Originally posted by McTapps
Originally posted by finn1918
Iíve noticed that most of the world (especially the Germans) donít know or care to learn about the American craft scene.
Well, much as people here might like to think otherwise, much of the beer from the American "craft" [sic] scene is crap.
To them, they are the last bastion of "real" beer, and megacorporations like ABInBev, MillerCoors, and Diaego are trying to destroy their traditions and introduce watered-down, adjunct-laden beer. And frankly, I could see their point of view if an ABInBev rep offered them a Bud as "the pinnacle of American quality."


Oh, I like your "especially the Germans" a lot....not. It is such a cliche, esp. if you are interested in beer and everything around, you get to know the wide market of the American beer scene. And I cannot tell you the amount of hours I spent on searching through the internet to get some proper online shop (one would do it) for ordering great American beers...I just couldnít find one. The online market is limited to all the watery stuff like Coors Light, Anheuser Busch etc.
Wait. You mean, you canít find an online shop that sells good American beer in Germany? Have you not tried bierzwerg and of course, bierkompass?
and in German shops you really canít get anything from America.
True.
I guess, the costs would be too high for too less people willing to pay that price when you have other world-class beers available for probably less than 1/10 that price ( like all the beers of Weihenstephan, Kloster Andechs, Schneider Weisse etc.).
NŲ, Andechser is only a step above the blandest German beer. Not worthy of being considered among the better ones.


And against your experience, there are quite some foreign beers available in Germany (not talking about Munich only, as Munich is a folk of is own).....there are many British beers around, as well as Belgian, Austrian, Czech -of course- and many many more. Sometimes it is also a matter of finding the bottle shop that suits you ;-)


Please tell me where youíre getting Czech beer!
4/24/2013 11:38:11 PM

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Erlangernick 1:2
Originally posted by jonas
I think things are slowly changing in Germany though. I was very impressed with the amount of interesting German beers at the recent Braukunst Live festival in Munich. Both all the new microbrewers and the more established medium sized breweries were going absoutely nuts making IPAs, dryhopped, barrel aged beer sand all sorts of historic styles. Even Hofbršuhaus made a very nice festival special.
At one of the panel discussions it was mentioned that german brewers slowly are realizing they have to renew themselves to have a competitive product.


As an ex-pat Yank in Bierfranken, itís ironic to see Germans starting to copy American microbrewers. I wish they would copy tschechische...Czech or British brewers though, with their quality low-gravity beers.

I also wish more brewers would simply make their beer *better* and charge a bit more for it! No hop extracts (or pellets!), no over-sparging, no too-short lagering...*sigh*
4/24/2013 11:42:12 PM

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Marko 3896:203
Umm, Erlangernick, I canít say Iíve been everywhere in Germany, far from it, but Iíve seen Breznaks and Litovels (if I remember correctly) and similar all the time in supermarkets. Both in Hessen and in ThŁringen
4/25/2013 1:40:42 AM

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chriso 7347:368
Originally posted by pivnizub
2. To too many germans beers is only "simple food"; they love cheap foodstuff! Slogan: get more, pay less! So they buy the cheapest crate of crappy Lager, with or without the Gebot.... Here itís no problem to find people with the newest smart-phone, the hugest flat-screen TV and the biggest SUV, who are proud that they bought one chicken for two Euros!

Interesting. In a country where beer is generally very cheap and living standards are generally pretty high Iíve often wondered why there donít seem to be more discriminating consumers to support a more progressive (and more expensive) beer market - and that encompasses both higher quality traditional products and more novel ones. If frugality with necessities and extravagance with luxuries is the norm and beer is firmly placed in the first category, that explains a lot! Conversely, over here in the UK, paying more for what would once have been regarded as staple foods - e.g. bread - has become something of a badge of honour for the well-heeled and has supported a niche, but sustainable, premium price market for those goods.
4/25/2013 2:57:11 AM

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theRunningBoar
I think in the bigger cities with a strong cultural (and young) bone it wouldnít be too hard to start a small brewery focusing on ícraftí beer. The great thing is that there are almost no monolopies (bar-wise) in germany. Itís very open and a huge amount of retailers. And it is very easy to organise events, ...
Focus would have to lie on distribution, grass-root level.
4/25/2013 3:28:32 AM

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left_bank 69:47

Originally posted by pivnizub
2. To too many germans beers is only "simple food"; they love cheap foodstuff! Slogan: get more, pay less! So they buy the cheapest crate of crappy Lager, with or without the Gebot.... Here itís no problem to find people with the newest smart-phone, the hugest flat-screen TV and the biggest SUV, who are proud that they bought one chicken for two Euros!
i have to respect your opinion because you have lived there all your life,but i have lived there periodically for a few years,i have known university students,families,girls i have dated,business associates,and beer drinking buddies and i do not know 2 people that fit into your mentioned catagory.
4/25/2013 3:53:54 AM

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Erlangernick 1:2
Germans...well, Franconians, enjoying German, well, Franconian Bier right now, 3;70 per Liter.
Ym2cldJzhD"
-- http://twitter.com/ErlangerNick/status/327455349051371521
4/25/2013 9:28:40 AM

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3fourths 7885:1268
Originally posted by chriso
Originally posted by pivnizub
2. To too many germans beers is only "simple food"; they love cheap foodstuff! Slogan: get more, pay less! So they buy the cheapest crate of crappy Lager, with or without the Gebot.... Here itís no problem to find people with the newest smart-phone, the hugest flat-screen TV and the biggest SUV, who are proud that they bought one chicken for two Euros!

Interesting. In a country where beer is generally very cheap and living standards are generally pretty high Iíve often wondered why there donít seem to be more discriminating consumers to support a more progressive (and more expensive) beer market - and that encompasses both higher quality traditional products and more novel ones.


speaking as a relatively-young guy (33) who ends up in a lot of German breweries, stubes and pubs, very often Iím one of youngest persons in the room. drinking at the brauhaus is a old manís game in Germany. the teenagers I see dragged along by their families to the biergarten remind me of myself when my mother would take me to the DMV: captive and bored, more likely to be playing a game on my phone than enjoying the 400 year-old charm of antlers and wall clocks and pretzels and fat old braumeisters.

if I grew up in that environment I would come to loathe the scene no matter how good the beer was. I would probably drink cocktails and wine in my 20s as a lot of Germans seem to do. now I would really like to a see more urban-based bars and restaurants turn their eye towards well-made beer both in-country and from abroad, presenting it in a different way than antlers and leiderhosen for the young urban earners, but thatís a tough thing to do now that the prices have dropped so much. a blessing that the well-made German beer is so cheap, a curse that the majority of the young drinkers still prefer the factory-made alternative because it costs 30% less.
4/25/2013 9:49:46 AM

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