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How do you ferment your sour beers?

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RABinCO
beers 1399 º places 87 º 17:38 Tue 12/10/2013

starting to think HornyDevil is just a troll.

 
Art
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beers 2310 º places 116 º 18:04 Tue 12/10/2013

Originally posted by RABinVA
starting to think HornyDevil is just a troll.


I can see where you might think that but it is false.

 
HornyDevil
18:10 Tue 12/10/2013

Originally posted by Cletus
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Rack off of fruit - I try to let the beer condition off of the fruit for at least a couple weeks before bottling


Cold crash?


Nope. Just allow it to get off the yeast cake and the fruit pieces so that I can get a finished beer into bottles that is as clear as possible.

 
HornyDevil
18:10 Tue 12/10/2013

Originally posted by artmcd8
Originally posted by RABinVA
starting to think HornyDevil is just a troll.


I can see where you might think that but it is false.


 
RABinCO
beers 1399 º places 87 º 18:17 Tue 12/10/2013

Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by artmcd8
Originally posted by RABinVA
starting to think HornyDevil is just a troll.


I can see where you might think that but it is false.





Ah, just blissfully ignorant then. Noted

 
wnoble
beers 1251 º 19:00 Tue 12/10/2013

Originally posted by CLevar
Originally posted by wnoble
the only sour I brewed was a totally spontaneous "coolship" type experiment. I called it a sour BUT itís still not sour after 9 months. shit.


Whereís the gravity at? What time of year was the wort set out?

When Iíve left wort outside in the late fall/early winter, the cold temp prevented anything from growing reproducibly (n=3, set out 3 mason jars, one developed mold after a week, and the other two didnít change even after a period of ~4 weeks)


I havenít checked the gravity, just tasted it back in September and it had a noticeable amount of sweet extract left but really had a nice almost saison/farmhouse character. No mold, just a thick brown yeast cake on top. I left it sit out for 36 hours back in Feb when it was about 40 at night.

 
CLevar
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places 16 º 19:16 Tue 12/10/2013

Originally posted by wnoble
Originally posted by CLevar
Originally posted by wnoble
the only sour I brewed was a totally spontaneous "coolship" type experiment. I called it a sour BUT itís still not sour after 9 months. shit.


Whereís the gravity at? What time of year was the wort set out?

When Iíve left wort outside in the late fall/early winter, the cold temp prevented anything from growing reproducibly (n=3, set out 3 mason jars, one developed mold after a week, and the other two didnít change even after a period of ~4 weeks)


I havenít checked the gravity, just tasted it back in September and it had a noticeable amount of sweet extract left but really had a nice almost saison/farmhouse character. No mold, just a thick brown yeast cake on top. I left it sit out for 36 hours back in Feb when it was about 40 at night.


Iíd just let it keep going. Cross your fingers and hope pedio gets going?

 
CLevar
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places 16 º 19:18 Tue 12/10/2013

Also, Iíd be keen on a picture of this brown yeast cake. After so long, Iíd imagine that the krausen would have fallen, and Iíve not really seen a pellicle be anything other than white.

 
wnoble
beers 1251 º 19:27 Tue 12/10/2013

Iíll post up some pics and a gravity reading in a couple weeks when I head back to Indiana.

As of the last time I looked at it back in Sept, there wasnít a pellicle just the floating yeast.

 
HornyDevil
03:57 Wed 12/11/2013

Originally posted by CLevar
Iím of the opinion that a more diverse pitch is better, especially if the goal is to create something with complexity as opposed to simply being sour and super attenuated. To this end, stepping up dregs in wort+glucose (to help bugs along that canít ferment maltose) seems to work well, especially when supplemented with healthy pitches of different Brett strains to get things going.


I could not agree more.

Originally posted by CLevar
Adding oak in some way shape or form seems to be a good thing.


What kind of oak?

Not so taken with oak character in a finished sour beer. That being said, it seems to become incorporated a lot more quickly in dark sour beers, as compared to their light counterparts. I did a light, but high ABV, sour a couple years ago that is just coming into its own because I used about a fourth of a spiral of light toast French oak in it. The character was distracting at first, but now, after almost 2 years in the bottle, it is finally tasting more incorporated.

Iím a fan of using spent oak spirals in sour beer as it seems that Brett likes to eat that which is still in the wood once all the oak character has been depleted. This is why Iím very interested in using a spent oak barrel as a primary fermenter. Even though it wonít bring any "oakiness" to the beer, it will bring something different than a beer that has spent itís primary fermentation in plastic, glass, or stainless.

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