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Non-Malt Fermentables


read 497 times • 9 replies • posted 9/21/2012 8:12:46 PM

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pellegjr 395:16
This is like, my fourth thread on the subject. Oh well.

Here are a few ingredients Iím thinking about using soon:

Wild Rice: Iím thinking low abv/low IBU session rice beer due to the expense and desire for a subtle malt profile to let the wild rice shine, like 40% Am 2-row, 40% wild rice, 20% long grain rice, cereal mashed.

Beans: I figure those super long chain polysaccharide would contribute some crazy viscosity to a stout, porter, etc. Thinking about adding about 8 ozs to my "ecuatorial" foreign extra stout.

Gelatin: See above on viscosity

Carrots/beets/other root veg: Wondering how this would do with a sour. Seems like the bugs would love those long chain starches.
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DA 1
Iíve used beets before, definitely a little goes a long way, adds a deep red color, but if you like that dirt geosmin flavor, it will come through. I dry hopped them, not sure if that makes a difference.
9/21/2012 8:20:22 PM

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pellegjr 395:16
Originally posted by DA
Iíve used beets before, definitely a little goes a long way, adds a deep red color, but if you like that dirt geosmin flavor, it will come through. I dry hopped them, not sure if that makes a difference.


Beet Saison mayhaps?
9/21/2012 8:21:47 PM

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pellegjr 395:16
Oh, also forgot milled Indian corn, will it provide any noticeable flavor contributions not garnered from straight maize?
9/21/2012 8:41:45 PM

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foduck 328:8
wouldnít gelatin just flocculate and make your beer really clear?
9/22/2012 2:13:58 PM

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Danko
Originally posted by foduck
wouldnít gelatin just flocculate and make your beer really clear?

Exactly. Itís not going to add to the viscosity but instead make it really clear.

Rice is an easy way to really clog up the lautering stage and get a stuck mash, it happened to myself and Struise during the first ArchaÔc Ale brew once. Also watch out for tannins.
9/23/2012 4:24:42 AM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by Danko
Rice is an easy way to really clog up the lautering stage and get a stuck mash, it happened to myself and Struise during the first ArchaÔc Ale brew once. Also watch out for tannins.


Never used wild rice, but I have used jasmine rice a couple of times and the beers turned out very well (saison and peppercorn tripel). Itís a fun ingredient and it smelled wonderful when I was cooking it, but it didnít impart a whole lot of anything to the finished product besides a lighter color and additional fermentables. Terribly disappointed that that great aroma didnít make it into the beer.

9/23/2012 6:53:20 AM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by pellegjr
Beans: I figure those super long chain polysaccharide would contribute some crazy viscosity to a stout, porter, etc. Thinking about adding about 8 ozs to my "ecuatorial" foreign extra stout.


Iíve used black beans before and the beer was a disaster. The protein in the beans made the beer both overcarbonated with MASSIVE head retention. Something in the beans also increased the hop utilization tremendously and the finished beer ended up with over the top bitterness. That being said, I used quite a few pounds of beans, so 8 oz (cooked or uncooked?) shouldnít be that much of a problem. I would think that a little less on the bittering side of things might not be a bad idea.
9/23/2012 6:59:04 AM

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beerinmeear 1
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by pellegjr
Beans: I figure those super long chain polysaccharide would contribute some crazy viscosity to a stout, porter, etc. Thinking about adding about 8 ozs to my "ecuatorial" foreign extra stout.


Iíve used black beans before and the beer was a disaster. The protein in the beans made the beer both overcarbonated with MASSIVE head retention. Something in the beans also increased the hop utilization tremendously and the finished beer ended up with over the top bitterness. That being said, I used quite a few pounds of beans, so 8 oz (cooked or uncooked?) shouldnít be that much of a problem. I would think that a little less on the bittering side of things might not be a bad idea.


did you boil the beans? That might have something to do with the bitterness, just like if you boiled grains (I donít see how the beans could increase hop utilization). Not sure how to utilize the beans though- itís not like malted barley with the sugar readily accessible for a sub-boil sparge extraction.
9/25/2012 2:08:51 PM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by beerinmeear
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by pellegjr
Beans: I figure those super long chain polysaccharide would contribute some crazy viscosity to a stout, porter, etc. Thinking about adding about 8 ozs to my "ecuatorial" foreign extra stout.


Iíve used black beans before and the beer was a disaster. The protein in the beans made the beer both overcarbonated with MASSIVE head retention. Something in the beans also increased the hop utilization tremendously and the finished beer ended up with over the top bitterness. That being said, I used quite a few pounds of beans, so 8 oz (cooked or uncooked?) shouldnít be that much of a problem. I would think that a little less on the bittering side of things might not be a bad idea.


did you boil the beans? That might have something to do with the bitterness, just like if you boiled grains (I donít see how the beans could increase hop utilization). Not sure how to utilize the beans though- itís not like malted barley with the sugar readily accessible for a sub-boil sparge extraction.


Nope,didnít boil them. Just cooked them and added them to the mash.
9/25/2012 2:16:05 PM

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