RateBeer

Stores "cellaring" hard to find beer

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robrules
places 1 º 13:30 Mon 5/7/2012

Originally posted by miketd
Personally, I wouldn’t pay more for cellared beer(a few exceptions out there), regardless of the venue. Why? Because most beer sucks aged, or at least doesn’t improve.


Where is the like button when you need one....

Should start a craft beer myths thread.

 
bootsjohn
beers 68 º places 28 º 13:52 Mon 5/7/2012

Originally posted by robrules
Originally posted by miketd
Personally, I wouldn’t pay more for cellared beer(a few exceptions out there), regardless of the venue. Why? Because most beer sucks aged, or at least doesn’t improve.


Where is the like button when you need one....

Should start a craft beer myths thread.




I had several aged Stone beers at an event last year, including IRS from 2003 and 2006, 2007 Double Bastard, and Vertical Epic 09. All of them tasted phenomenal, and when put side-by-side with current counterparts (VE 09 excluded), displayed some superior attributes. Perhaps having a brewery cellar its own beers maintains higher quality control than if a small store tries it.

That said, lots of beers age beautifully. Aging is no myth, though it may primarily be a matter of taste.

 
jbrana
beers 590 º places 33 º 13:52 Mon 5/7/2012

Originally posted by robrules
Originally posted by miketd
Personally, I wouldn’t pay more for cellared beer(a few exceptions out there), regardless of the venue. Why? Because most beer sucks aged, or at least doesn’t improve.


Where is the like button when you need one....

Should start a craft beer myths thread.




If y’all have never had a properly aged imperial stout or barley wine, I feel sorry for you. Not a myth.

 
DietPepsican
premium
beers 1533 º places 56 º 13:56 Mon 5/7/2012

Enjoy your few year wait to thin out your imperial stouts and add a big helping of soy sauce and cardboard, I’ll just enjoy them fresh(ish)

 
DietPepsican
premium
beers 1533 º places 56 º 14:00 Mon 5/7/2012

( )

 
miketd
places 125 º 14:00 Mon 5/7/2012

I’ve had plenty of aged beer, and with the exception of a few Barley Wines, they don’t improve. 99% of beer is a waste of time and space to age. I would like to ask: How does a Stout improve? Why? I guess if you like oxidation and/or butterscotch it makes sense.

 
TheBeerSommelier
premium
14:07 Mon 5/7/2012

Originally posted by robrules
Originally posted by miketd
Personally, I wouldn’t pay more for cellared beer(a few exceptions out there), regardless of the venue. Why? Because most beer sucks aged, or at least doesn’t improve.


Where is the like button when you need one....

Should start a craft beer myths thread.



Cellared beer, when done properly and with beers that age well, can be sublime.

I presented four cellared beers to a class at Siebel, two weeks ago, being taught by one of the world’s foremost brewmasters. They were ’07 Weyerbacher Insanity, ’07 Trader Joes Vintage Ale, ’02 Samichlaus and I’ve forgotten the last one.

Not only did everyone in class (including the co-instructors, Dr. Michael Zepf and Cilene Saorin) agree that these particular offerings were incredibly complex and generally delicious, they stood up and applauded. I had to note that I didn’t make the beers, I merely had the forethought to lay them down.

The point is, to paint an entire canvas with the same brush is silly and counterproductive. Beer cellaring, while still in in its infancy, is a great experiment that’s producing more information and insight every year.

 
brewtopian
beers 2 º 14:20 Mon 5/7/2012

As for the merits of cellaring I’d have to put myself in the fresher is better camp. I will say however that barley wines and smoked beers lend themselves to cellaring. I was fortunate enough to try a vertical of Alaskan Smoked Porter going back to 2010 and it was amazing just how much that beer had changed with time. Not one bottle was bad.

Now, last year I went to a Stone Vertical Epic tasting with bottles going back to 2003 and all but the ’09, ’10 and ’11 were drinkable. The ’08 was borderline but everything else was either well past its prime or drain swill.

 
levifunk
beers 12 º 14:47 Mon 5/7/2012

Originally posted by brewtopian
As for the merits of cellaring I’d have to put myself in the fresher is better camp. I will say however that barley wines and smoked beers lend themselves to cellaring. I was fortunate enough to try a vertical of Alaskan Smoked Porter going back to 2010 and it was amazing just how much that beer had changed with time. Not one bottle was bad.

Now, last year I went to a Stone Vertical Epic tasting with bottles going back to 2003 and all but the ’09, ’10 and ’11 were drinkable. The ’08 was borderline but everything else was either well past its prime or drain swill.


Using the VE series as an example of why beer doesn’t improve is just silly.

 
brewtopian
beers 2 º 15:04 Mon 5/7/2012

I’m not using as an example of why beer doesn’t improve only to show that not every beer, and I would say the vast majority of beers are better consumed fresh.