RateBeer

Time to explore Europes Beer

read 1158 times • 24 replies •

Thread Frozen
 
chriso
premium
beers 7513 º places 467 º 04:56 Wed 6/12/2013

One other thing about the trains in those parts, especially if coming to London (or York). In the UK there can be different train operating companies operating similar services on the same track. If you are coming to London from Sunderland you can use either East Coast or Grand Central. The latter runs direct services from Sunderland to London (via York) with no changes. Using East Coast you would have to change trains at least once. Also, Grand Central are invariably cheaper than East Coast. However, East Coast donít run many trains a day so itís easy to miss their services if using an online journey planner (such as National Rail Enquiries).

 
TAR
beers 2518 º places 30 º 11:32 Wed 6/12/2013

Originally posted by Erlangernick


Iíd cheerfully swap all 280(?) Franconian breweries for a handful of northern UK ones though, thatís an easy decision. It would be hard to see Roppelt, Griess (have you been yet?), and Witzgall go, but thatís the price to pay.

You canít say you like/love cask ale until youíve had it properly in situ, IMO.

Yeah, as much as I have done my best to educate myself about cask ale over the years and express interest when I visit brewpubs, my relative lack of knowledge will surely be illuminated when I finally make the pilgrimage to the motherland. I will try to juggle England with my next visit to Franconia!

Funny you should ask about Griess, as I was finally able to try the kellerbier in proper form, straight from the gravity barrel at the source. Much to my delight, it was very characterful and supremely quaffable with plenty of dryness, sturdy minerals, vivid pils malt, Spalt-laden pizazz, and, as with our beloved Witzgall Landbier, even some juicy nectarine eccentricities. My two experiences with bottles were unequivocally similar: a dull, underattenuated, and lifeless beer. I should have known better, since many kellerbiers fare so poorly from the bottle. Moral to the story: After numerous visits to Franconia, regardless of how lackluster a bottled product might perform, I am learning how enlightening it can be to visit the brewery to try all beers fresh vom fass.

The more I think I know, the very opposite becomes indubitably apparent: I really know nothing. :-)

Sorry for the diversion.

 
Erlangernick
beers 1 º places 2 º 00:22 Tue 6/18/2013

Originally posted by TAR
Originally posted by Erlangernick


Iíd cheerfully swap all 280(?) Franconian breweries for a handful of northern UK ones though, thatís an easy decision. It would be hard to see Roppelt, Griess (have you been yet?), and Witzgall go, but thatís the price to pay.

You canít say you like/love cask ale until youíve had it properly in situ, IMO.

Yeah, as much as I have done my best to educate myself about cask ale over the years and express interest when I visit brewpubs, my relative lack of knowledge will surely be illuminated when I finally make the pilgrimage to the motherland. I will try to juggle England with my next visit to Franconia!

Funny you should ask about Griess, as I was finally able to try the kellerbier in proper form, straight from the gravity barrel at the source.
Well now, there are gravity barrels, and then there are "gravity barrels". If you had it at the Bierkeller outside the village, then yes, thatís a proper bayerischer Anstich gravity pour. But in the Brauerei Gaststštte, Peter Griess uses a very well-disgused 9-litre stunt barrel to dispense the Kellerbier under CO2 pressure.
Much to my delight, it was very characterful and supremely quaffable with plenty of dryness, sturdy minerals, vivid pils malt, Spalt-laden pizazz, and, as with our beloved Witzgall Landbier, even some juicy nectarine eccentricities. My two experiences with bottles were unequivocally similar: a dull, underattenuated, and lifeless beer. I should have known better, since many kellerbiers fare so poorly from the bottle. Moral to the story: After numerous visits to Franconia, regardless of how lackluster a bottled product might perform, I am learning how enlightening it can be to visit the brewery to try all beers fresh vom fass.

The more I think I know, the very opposite becomes indubitably apparent: I really know nothing. :-)

Sorry for the diversion.


A good Saturdayís outing would be starting at Roppelt, then heading on to Witzgall, and ending at the Griess Keller, thus patronising the holy triumvirate of Kellerbier in one day. Something Iíve personally yet to accomplish in my cursed life, with weekends being largely under the control of Mrs, who isnít so keen on entire Saturdays spent tooling around from Bierkeller to Bierkeller. (Saturdays because Sundays are simply insanely crowded, and the roads...)

FWIW, AFAIK the Roppelt beer in the Gaststštte is normal, filtered keg stuff, whereas the Kellerbier is unfiltered, naturally-carbonated stuff dispensed from the 1000 litre key-keg-like bag-in-a-tank-with-an-air-compressor-system.

 
Erlangernick
beers 1 º places 2 º 00:25 Tue 6/18/2013

And TAR, you really should visit England. On its own, not as some sort of day-trip from Bamberg. Much as you love the fršnkische Bierkultur, as a Yank, youíll likely find British pub and real ale culture equally lovable, just in different ways.