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Yeast strain importance as relating to style

read 1126 times • 13 replies •

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sawdeanz
beers 5 º places 1 º 13:23 Wed 2/13/2013

I’m pretty new to everything but am about to start my second mr. beer batch. I picked out a doppelbock recipe because I like the style. One thing I’ve noticed is that nearly all mr. beer recipes/kits, including this one use an ale yeast to make brewing process easier (as it can be made at roomtemp). I’m just curious as to how this affects adherence of the beer to the style. Is a doppelbock brewed with ale instead of lager yeast still technically a true bock?
This is more of just a curiosity i’m not necessarily interested in using a different type of yeast than supplied.

 
drewbeerme
beers 3902 º places 1 º 13:25 Wed 2/13/2013

No

 
VsXsV
premium
beers 2875 º places 49 º 13:26 Wed 2/13/2013

Nope, a bock needs to be fermented with a lager yeast. Should be some kind of strong ale instead if you use an ale yeast.

 
HornyDevil
14:22 Wed 2/13/2013

Originally posted by sawdeanz
I’m just curious as to how this affects adherence of the beer to the style. Is a doppelbock brewed with ale instead of lager yeast still technically a true bock?


As all have said, no, this won’t be a bock unless it is fermented with a bottom fermenting lager strain.

Originally posted by sawdeanz
This is more of just a curiosity i’m not necessarily interested in using a different type of yeast than supplied.


That being said, you can still come out with a good beer, it just won’t be technically a bock and you shouldn’t expect it to be.

 
TheBeerSommelier
premium
16:51 Wed 2/13/2013


As an aside, bocks may indeed be ales.

You may not end up with a doppelbock, according to BJCP guidelines, but top fermenting yeasts can most definitely create a bock.

F’rinstance, Weizenbocks are ales that are bocks. It’s technically a designation of strength, not yeast strain.

 
HornyDevil
17:45 Wed 2/13/2013

Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier

As an aside, bocks may indeed be ales.

You may not end up with a doppelbock, according to BJCP guidelines, but top fermenting yeasts can most definitely create a bock.

F’rinstance, Weizenbocks are ales that are bocks. It’s technically a designation of strength, not yeast strain.


I don’t believe the style of weizenbock ever entered into the discussion.

 
TheBeerSommelier
premium
17:51 Wed 2/13/2013

Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier

As an aside, bocks may indeed be ales.

You may not end up with a doppelbock, according to BJCP guidelines, but top fermenting yeasts can most definitely create a bock.

F’rinstance, Weizenbocks are ales that are bocks. It’s technically a designation of strength, not yeast strain.


I don’t believe the style of weizenbock ever entered into the discussion.


I’m not sure you understand what the word "aside" means.

 
mtoast
beers 336 º places 13 º 20:49 Wed 2/13/2013

Before you two get into a meaningless circle jerk, OP ditch the Mr. Beer kit, find a local homebrew shop and get set up brewing real beer. Even the most basic homebrew setup will yield infinitely better beer than any Mr. Beer kit.

 
joeneugs
premium
beers 4305 º places 188 º 21:03 Wed 2/13/2013

This ^ …. big time!

 
joet
premium
admin
beers 2409 º places 100 º 22:32 Wed 2/13/2013

Originally posted by mtoast
Before you two get into a meaningless circle jerk, OP ditch the Mr. Beer kit, find a local homebrew shop and get set up brewing real beer. Even the most basic homebrew setup will yield infinitely better beer than any Mr. Beer kit.


yep

 
HornyDevil
06:07 Thu 2/14/2013

Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier

As an aside, bocks may indeed be ales.

You may not end up with a doppelbock, according to BJCP guidelines, but top fermenting yeasts can most definitely create a bock.

F’rinstance, Weizenbocks are ales that are bocks. It’s technically a designation of strength, not yeast strain.


I don’t believe the style of weizenbock ever entered into the discussion.


I’m not sure you understand what the word "aside" means.


Here are some other, equally useful to the discussion of brewing a doppelbock with Mr. Beer, asides:

Bocks originated in the Northern German city of Einbeck, which was a brewing center and popular exporter in the days of the Hanseatic League (14th to 17th century). Recreated in Munich starting in the 17th century. The name “bock” is based on a corruption of the name “Einbeck” in the Bavarian dialect, and was thus only used after the beer came to Munich. “Bock” also means “billy-goat” in German, and is often used in logos and advertisements.

Doppelbock is a Bavarian specialty first brewed in Munich by the monks of St. Francis of Paula. Historical versions were less well attenuated than modern interpretations, with consequently higher sweetness and lower alcohol levels (and hence was considered “liquid bread” by the monks). The term “doppel (double) bock” was coined by Munich consumers. Many doppelbocks have names ending in “-ator,” either as a tribute to the prototypical Salvator or to take advantage of the beer’s popularity.

Aventinus, the world’s oldest top-fermented wheat doppelbock, was created in 1907 at the Weisse Brauhaus in Munich using the ‘Méthode Champenoise’ with fresh yeast sediment on the bottom. It was Schneider’s creative response to bottom-fermenting doppelbocks that developed a strong following during these times.

/circlejerk

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