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Using gelatin to clear a beer....


read 3439 times • 23 replies • posted 9/25/2012 5:23:29 PM

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CLevar 376:10
I have a hoppy pale fermented with 100% brett b trois that I would like to keg up quickly and get looking pretty fast in order to take advantage of the great fruit profile. There is quite a lot of suspended yeast (and other particulates) in the beer still, even though the gravity is about where I want it (1.005 at last reading).

I was thinking of using gelatin to help clarify it, but have never used any fining agent in my beer before. I had read that gelatin can significantly alter the flavor profile of the beer (removing yeast, hop particulates, etc), and wanted to see if anyone had any recommendations for or against using this.

Thanks!

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by CLevar
I have a hoppy pale fermented with 100% brett b trois that I would like to keg up quickly and get looking pretty fast in order to take advantage of the great fruit profile. There is quite a lot of suspended yeast (and other particulates) in the beer still, even though the gravity is about where I want it (1.005 at last reading).

I was thinking of using gelatin to help clarify it, but have never used any fining agent in my beer before. I had read that gelatin can significantly alter the flavor profile of the beer (removing yeast, hop particulates, etc), and wanted to see if anyone had any recommendations for or against using this.


First let me say that Iíve never used gelatin or any other post-kettle fining agent, so I wonít be much help to you there.

However, it begs the question of why would you want to do this, taking into consideration that you will make this beer much less hoppy by doing so?
9/25/2012 5:37:11 PM

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CLevar 376:10
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by CLevar
I have a hoppy pale fermented with 100% brett b trois that I would like to keg up quickly and get looking pretty fast in order to take advantage of the great fruit profile. There is quite a lot of suspended yeast (and other particulates) in the beer still, even though the gravity is about where I want it (1.005 at last reading).

I was thinking of using gelatin to help clarify it, but have never used any fining agent in my beer before. I had read that gelatin can significantly alter the flavor profile of the beer (removing yeast, hop particulates, etc), and wanted to see if anyone had any recommendations for or against using this.


First let me say that Iíve never used gelatin or any other post-kettle fining agent, so I wonít be much help to you there.

However, it begs the question of why would you want to do this, taking into consideration that you will make this beer much less hoppy by doing so?



Hence my question. I donít actually know how much "less hoppy" this will make the beer. I know that it will remove hop particulates which is desirable(read; I didnít use a hop bag at any stage, and the fermentor is full of hop pieces from the dry hop). As far as I know, it should not remove soluble or very small insoluble compounds, which may mean that at least some/most of the alpha acids, etc are retained in solution. I could be off here though, which is why I am asking for help.
9/25/2012 5:49:08 PM

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Unclerudy 12:3
Cold crash it to drop out whatever you dont want. Then use a filter, and force carb it. Clarifying agents are for chumps. Time, temp, and gravity will clear all beers. For everything else, use a filter.
9/25/2012 7:32:41 PM

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CLevar 376:10
Originally posted by Unclerudy
Cold crash it to drop out whatever you dont want. Then use a filter, and force carb it. Clarifying agents are for chumps. Time, temp, and gravity will clear all beers. For everything else, use a filter.


Nowhere did I say I have a filter. It would be a non-issue if in fact I did have a filter.

As for time, I would really like to get this serving ASAP to take advantage of the wonderful aromatics this beer currently has, so that seems to defeat the purpose.

Hence, my question about gelatin.

It seems like the general consensus is "Donít use it", in which case I am fine drinking cloudy and very tasty beer.
9/25/2012 7:37:15 PM

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NobleSquirrel 3437:209
Originally posted by Unclerudy
Cold crash it to drop out whatever you dont want. Then use a filter, and force carb it. Clarifying agents are for chumps. Time, temp, and gravity will clear all beers. For everything else, use a filter.


I couldnít disagree more. Findings are a great way to take out the extra crap. Iíd recommend super clear kc. Within 48hrs youíll have a good looking beer without stripping anything else out.
9/25/2012 8:00:46 PM

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CLevar 376:10
Originally posted by NobleSquirrel
Originally posted by Unclerudy
Cold crash it to drop out whatever you dont want. Then use a filter, and force carb it. Clarifying agents are for chumps. Time, temp, and gravity will clear all beers. For everything else, use a filter.


I couldnít disagree more. Findings are a great way to take out the extra crap. Iíd recommend super clear kc. Within 48hrs youíll have a good looking beer without stripping anything else out.


Thanks!
9/25/2012 8:10:10 PM

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bitbucket 2159:63
Isinglass.

Iíve never tried it personally, but you should and then report back.
9/25/2012 8:49:48 PM

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Danko
Itís too late now of course but throwing in protafloc at the end of the boil along with filtering through something like a sanitized muslin- or nylon bag when transfering to the fermenter goes a really long way if youíre also force carbonating and letting the beer sit and settle.
9/26/2012 4:35:19 AM

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Unclerudy 12:3
Cut an inch off your dip tube. You will miss most of anything left in the keg when serving.
9/26/2012 5:25:29 AM

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seymour 1434:45
Originally posted by Danko
...filtering through something like a sanitized muslin- or nylon bag when transfering to the fermenter goes a really long way...

A similar po-boy solution I use is wrapping a little cheesecloth around the racking tube when transferring to the bottling bucket.
9/26/2012 6:26:19 AM

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