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Wild/natural fermentation


read 2297 times • 35 replies • posted 10/2/2012 4:36:12 AM

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sharpe1987 8:
I have just began rolling around the idea of naturally fermenting a beer by just sticking a bucket out in a field/by the woods.

My question: being that itís almost fall, would a drop in temperature affect he amount/type of wild yeasts floating around? Iím located in Kentucky and it currently ranges from the 70s to the 40s

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502Che 999:47
Iíd probably be more worried about animals and bugs eating/drinking the beer. I dont really know much about the process, but thats what my instinctual worry would be.
10/2/2012 4:42:13 AM

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joeneugs 3478:155
You actually want the temperature to be lower, like somewhere in the 40ís to 50ís would be ideal. Certain kinds of undesirable bacteria are more active at higher temperatures. This is why most lambic producers donít brew during the hotter summer months.

Most homebrewers havenít had good results from spontaneous fermentations alone, but some have had better results when also pitching a starter made from bottle dregs of bottle conditioned wild ales.

Hereís a link for an article written by Oldsock. This will get you on the right track. He has a lot of good information on what youíre trying to do. You definitely want to cover your buckets with cheesecloth or something to keep insects and pests out. Also check out the book Wild Brews by Jeff Sparrow. Good luck!

http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2011/04/ambient-spontaneous-yeast-starters.html
10/2/2012 4:55:42 AM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by joeneugs
Most homebrewers havenít had good results from spontaneous fermentations alone, but some have had better results when also pitching a starter made from bottle dregs of bottle conditioned wild ales.


Personally, I think that this is the best way to brew sour ales period. Make a starter from the dreggs or just pitch the dreggs themselves into horny wort. The way that I figure it is that youíve got the microbes in the percentages that make great sour/wild beer within that bottle, so why not use that fact to your advantage?
10/2/2012 5:09:02 AM

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OldSock
My concern with pitching dregs and nothing else is that you donít know what microbes survived in that acidic/alcoholic environment. Fresher is better, lower ABV is better, but that is still no guarantee that the microbes at work early-on in a fermentation survived into the final beer. I usually pitch some ale yeast to ensure a healthy initial fermentation.



I have a batch going with nothing but dregs I grew from bottles of 3 Fonteinen, excited to see how it turns outÖ in a couple more years.

10/2/2012 6:34:18 AM

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sharpe1987 8:
Originally posted by OldSock


I have a batch going with nothing but dregs I grew from bottles of 3 Fonteinen, excited to see how it turns outÖ in a couple more years.




Couple more years because of how slow the fermentation is taking or because you need to age the beer?
10/2/2012 6:48:25 AM

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CLevar 13
Originally posted by sharpe1987
Originally posted by OldSock


I have a batch going with nothing but dregs I grew from bottles of 3 Fonteinen, excited to see how it turns outÖ in a couple more years.




Couple more years because of how slow the fermentation is taking or because you need to age the beer?


Yes
10/2/2012 7:25:44 AM

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DA 1
Iíve only got one spontaneous fermentation to take off, quite a few have failed. Definitely give it a shot, itís kind of a roll of the dice. What the lambic brewers have going for them is years of yeast/bacteria stored up in the walls, tanks and barrels. Definitely be patient, you most likely wonít have any activity for a week or so, mold might form, things may look ugly, but it may end up fermenting.

Another option is to build starts with local fruit skins. Iíve done a couple wild beers fermented from yeast/bacteria from berries and apples that Iíve picked. These beers have turned out pretty well with some unique yeast flavors.
10/2/2012 7:33:24 AM

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levifunk 12:
Originally posted by CLevar
Originally posted by sharpe1987
Originally posted by OldSock


I have a batch going with nothing but dregs I grew from bottles of 3 Fonteinen, excited to see how it turns outÖ in a couple more years.




Couple more years because of how slow the fermentation is taking or because you need to age the beer?


Yes


10/2/2012 7:44:21 AM

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Billicus 289:16
My feet would certain, act as a strater the yeasties between me toes, are nasty little Suckas!
10/2/2012 9:37:10 AM

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OldSock
Originally posted by sharpe1987

Originally posted by OldSock




I have a batch going with nothing but dregs I grew from bottles of 3 Fonteinen, excited to see how it turns outÖ in a couple more years.








Couple more years because of how slow the fermentation is taking or because you need to age the beer?





It started fermenting within a day, and that initial blast was energetic. However, the ďotherĒ microbes need time to create acids, esters, and a low final gravity. The first sample after a month was high in sulfur, but Iím excited to see where it ends up!



Here is the recipe/process if anyone is interested: http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2012/09/stolen-microbes-lambic-with-3-fonteinen.html
10/2/2012 12:02:24 PM

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