Irish Moss and clarifiers

Reads 10442 • Replies 16 • Started Thursday, September 1, 2005 7:43:24 PM CT

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aracauna
beers 3989 º places 104 º 19:43 Thu 9/1/2005

My english blonde is REALLY cloudy. I also forgot to add Irish moss during the boil for this one and the only beers I’ve forgotten on before were dark enough to not be noticeable. Does Irish moss clarify the beer a lot, or is it really just minor tweaking? Does it clear out protein haze or is that unavoidable outside of a protein rest during mashing?

Jacob

 
Inveigler
beers 371 º 21:37 Thu 9/1/2005

Irish moss helps, but is totally unnecessary to clarify. I just brewed a kolsch that had no irish moss. I cold conditioned it for 4 weeks and by the end of that time it was clear as anything you’d want. If you have the fridge to do it, cold condition the brew and it will clarify.

If not, try isinglass (sp?). I’ve added this to a secondary a few times and I think it had pretty good results.----------

 
erway
beers 1004 º places 41 º 21:54 Thu 9/1/2005

Originally posted by Inveigler
Irish moss helps, but is totally unnecessary to clarify. I just brewed a kolsch that had no irish moss. I cold conditioned it for 4 weeks and by the end of that time it was clear as anything you’d want. If you have the fridge to do it, cold condition the brew and it will clarify.

If not, try isinglass (sp?). I’ve added this to a secondary a few times and I think it had pretty good results.----------


Fish bladders! That’s some pretty nasty stuff which is why almost no pro-brewers use it any longer. And if you are going to crash the beer then isinglass would be redundant. I disagree that Irish Moss is "totally unnecessary". While you can get a clear beer without it, as Rogue claims to do, it is a hell of a lot easier with Irish Moss. I use it in every beer except ones that I intend on being cloudy. Cold conditioning will drop out hop haze and yeast but will not clear the beer of all protein haze. If you used wheat, 6-row, or Continental Pils malt then doing a protein rest would have helped but if you used a regular well-modified malt then it wouldn’t have done much if anything. On that note I’d say that crashing it out is the best option. Give it two weeks and see if it’s cleared. If it has, great. If not...so you’ve got a cloudy beer. Worst things have happened. All beer until about 1820 was cloudy. They seemed to like it enough to make it that way for a few thousand years. Best of luck.

 
JoeMcPhee
beers 11253 º places 543 º 03:39 Fri 9/2/2005

I had the same problem, with the same style of beer. I used a tbsp of geletin, dissolved in hot water and it dropped bright in under 24 hours.

 
MAP
beers 1133 º places 26 º 03:45 Fri 9/2/2005

Originally posted by erway
Originally posted by Inveigler
Irish moss helps, but is totally unnecessary to clarify. I just brewed a kolsch that had no irish moss. I cold conditioned it for 4 weeks and by the end of that time it was clear as anything you’d want. If you have the fridge to do it, cold condition the brew and it will clarify.

If not, try isinglass (sp?). I’ve added this to a secondary a few times and I think it had pretty good results.----------


Fish bladders! That’s some pretty nasty stuff which is why almost no pro-brewers use it any longer. And if you are going to crash the beer then isinglass would be redundant. I disagree that Irish Moss is "totally unnecessary". While you can get a clear beer without it, as Rogue claims to do, it is a hell of a lot easier with Irish Moss. I use it in every beer except ones that I intend on being cloudy. Cold conditioning will drop out hop haze and yeast but will not clear the beer of all protein haze. If you used wheat, 6-row, or Continental Pils malt then doing a protein rest would have helped but if you used a regular well-modified malt then it wouldn’t have done much if anything. On that note I’d say that crashing it out is the best option. Give it two weeks and see if it’s cleared. If it has, great. If not...so you’ve got a cloudy beer. Worst things have happened. All beer until about 1820 was cloudy. They seemed to like it enough to make it that way for a few thousand years. Best of luck.


erway why are you not a brewmaster of some brewery? I’ve seen all these posts from/about you and damn, makes me sad that your ideas/experiences are not in commerical bottle form. Do we need to throw a coup at Rouge or something?

 
aracauna
beers 3989 º places 104 º 05:47 Fri 9/2/2005

Originally posted by erway
Give it two weeks and see if it’s cleared. If it has, great. If not...so you’ve got a cloudy beer. Worst things have happened. All beer until about 1820 was cloudy. They seemed to like it enough to make it that way for a few thousand years. Best of luck.


I don’t really personally care, but I’d like to be able to get the beer to look and taste like I intended it to. It tastes fine and I have no problems with drinking the beer, I just know that there’ll be times when I’m intending a clear beer and don’t wanted to know if my lack of Irish moss was probably the main culprit. Oh and it was all Marris Otter and a pound of wheat malt in a 5 gallon batch.

Jacob

 
jonbarleycorn
beers 2 º 05:48 Fri 9/2/2005

I tried some clarifiers on some beer, I didn’t like the results it affected the flavor I think. But it wasn’t a scientific study by any means, but I won’t ever do it again. I used PPV , but not gelatin. I have talked to a guy the uses gelatin a lot, but I see no need for it, after kegging and in the refer, it clears out nicely in time, and if not, it still tastes great.

 
kook
beers 2033 º places 34 º 05:53 Fri 9/2/2005

Originally posted by erway
Fish bladders! That’s some pretty nasty stuff which is why almost no pro-brewers use it any longer.


I know it’s the case in homebrew circles, but isinglass is still used extensively in commercial brewing, at least in the UK and Australia.

 
Frank
beers 4461 º places 92 º 11:20 Fri 9/2/2005

I find that witfloc tablets work much better than Irish moss at making the break coagulate. Just a suggestion for the future...

Really, any beer will clear if you give it enough time whether you want it to or not.

 
SaveTheAles
beers 5 º 13:07 Fri 9/2/2005

I’ve found most hop-induced hazes don’t drop out with just cold-conditioning. If it does, you aren’t using enough hops. Order a Pliny at RR and you’ll see what I mean. People ask what’s wrong if the beer looks too clear.

Good hot and cold breaks go a long way toward preventing hazing issues.

 
Frank
beers 4461 º places 92 º 14:38 Fri 9/2/2005

Originally posted by SaveTheAles
I’ve found most hop-induced hazes don’t drop out with just cold-conditioning.


It just takes a long time. My RB 1849 was hazy as hell when I bottled it (and all from the dry hopping too). It’s gotta have been six months by now but it finally pours clear.

The hop sediment is really easy to stir up though.

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