overall
55
92
style
Marks & Spencer
Brewed at St. Austell

Style: Golden Ale/Blond Ale
Paddington, England

bottling
unknown

on tap
unknown

Local Distribution

Add Distribution Data
RATINGS: 32   MEAN: 3.29/5.0   WEIGHTED AVG: 3.25/5   EST. CALORIES: 132   ABV: 4.4%
COMMERCIAL DESCRIPTION
Bottle conditioned; Regular
This easy-drinking pale ale is made with a blend of three hops (Fuggles, Celeia and Willamette) and Cornish malts including Maris Otter, Pale Malt and Cornish Gold.

A tick is a star rating
  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5


3.3
Alengrin (6007) - BELGIUM - DEC 15, 2017
One of the many brews commissioned by Marks & Spencer, in this case an EPA (or indeed rather a golden ale) made for them at St. Austell in Cornwall; from a 50 cl bottle belonging to a pack of six different ones, received as a gift - thanks Jeremy! Medium thick, eggshell-white, regular head, settling as a moussy ring of half a centimeter thick and a thin, disparate pattern of flats 'islands' in the middle; cristal clear, warm pale orange-tinged "old gold" robe, no visible sparkling, turning lightly hazy in the very end when the yeast sediment is added, with a thin 'soup' of translucent yeast bits spreaded throughout. Classically English pale ale aroma of lightly toasted white bread, cheese crackers, melting margarine, hard butterscotch candy, sweetclover, freshly cut nettles, hints of grass, dried thyme, vague accent of orange zest. Light, fruity onset, low in esters as is to be expected from a classic English style ale, notes of apple peel and unripe apricot, only restrainedly sweetish, with a thin sourish edge; carbonation is soft, mouthfeel supple and thin, just a little bit oily thanks to the hops. Rounded but 'clean' barley malt middle, cereally with a feather light breadiness to it thanks to the yeast, white bread and cereals, with minerally side notes (from the Cornish spring water with which this is brewed, I assume). Finishes with this thinly spread, smooth maltiness becoming notably creamy and even buttery in the end, coloured by a floral, mildly spicy and gently herbal hop bitterness, light and 'noble' as expected, but well-dosed for this style and quite 'vivid' in comparison with other, more industrial examples of English pale ale / golden ale. Which in itself is actually bottled (and ideally bottle-conditioned) English bitter really, and that goes for this one as well: decent for what it is, certainly considering the fact that this is, all things considered, a 'supermarket beer', but it lacks in the delicate, refined character one would find in a cask-conditioned bitter of similar style, strength and structure. Easygoing and correct, no off-flavours and going down easily and pleasantly, but perhaps that beautiful Willamette hop could have been a bit more pronounced to lend it more colour and character...

3.2
Desverger (14030) - Copenhagen, DENMARK - SEP 11, 2017
Bottle in London shared with the folks - gold pour with white head. Sweet light fruity and white bready malty, some lemon citrus notes, grassy and light delicate floral hoppy finish.

3.6
johndoughty (5600) - cheslyn hay, West Midlands, ENGLAND - MAY 24, 2017
Bottle. Golden with a small head. Slightly hoppy.Not a lot of body but a reasonable if not very exciting session beer.

2.2
Cokemonkey11 (1148) - - APR 30, 2017
Bottle. Pours pale golden with a thin head. Scent is a mix of nice pale malt notes and dusty aromas. Taste is pale ale and a bit raspy, which gets a bit more harsh as it warms. Slightly skunky but ultimately okay.

3
BlackHaddock (8073) - Shropshire, ENGLAND - FEB 21, 2017
Live rate during a mini-session with myself and no one else. 500ml bottle: BBE Jun 17. Poured (or tried to pour) into a UK pint sleeve, at home on 21st feb 17. Bit of a gusher, so while it settles I will bore you with the glass its in: a 2006 30th Cotswold Beer Festival glass (CAMRA) from Postlip Hall, used to love going there: sadly my friend has moved away, so we’ve stopped going. Clear light golden body, full (huge) white topping. Mild fruity aroma and taste, easy blend with subtle flavours: difficult to select a defining hop taste or malty lead, maybe a little sweetish, so I’ll go with the malts, although the finish is leaning towards bitter and dry. Not the most exciting beers around, but pleasant enough if you don’t want your senses tested too greatly.

3.3
john44 (3510) - SW London, Greater London, ENGLAND - JAN 12, 2017
Bottle. Clear Orangey Gold in colour. Spare white head. Fruity; orange and tangerine citrus. Very Salty. Hoppy; grassy hops. Malty; biscuity malts, caramel. Starts sweet-bitter citrus fruity. Becomes quite salty and increasingly dry. Ends bitter fruity and salty. However, despite the salt or perhaps because of it, I quite liked this. Very drinkable. Note: Try another bottle to see how salty that is. (2015-12-04)

3
Dervock (1541) - AUSTRALIA - DEC 30, 2016
Bottle - pours gold with a white head. Aroma is cardboard, cereal malt, nuts. Taste is malty with a bit of fruit up front.

3
ManVsBeer (11451) - Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire, ENGLAND - AUG 17, 2016
Bottle from Marks & Spencer, Manchester. Paler golden in colour with an extremely thin head. Has a nice pale ale texture, one that’s very drinkable, with a mainly hoppy character, although there’s an underlying maltiness in there. There’s also a very small fruitiness.

2.8
Mr_Pink_152 (5912) - Lincoln, Lincolnshire, ENGLAND - JUL 31, 2016
Bottle from M&S Lincoln. Pale golden colour with a white head. Light malty and fruity aroma, and taste.

3.2
downender (9054) - Bristol, Gloucestershire, ENGLAND - MAY 23, 2016
Bottle. Amber, with next to no head. Aroma of ripe, sweet, grains and some hedgerow hops. Flavour had similar maltiness, a touch of fruit and decent, bitter, finish. Good.


We Want To Hear From You



Join us! RateBeer is made by beer enthusiasts for the craft beer community. Your basic membership is free and allows you to read all beer ratings. Click here to create your account... and give your opinion!

Join Us »



Page    1  2 3 4
A tick is a star rating
  • Currently 0/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5