overall
92
96
style
Brewed by Paulaner Brauerei (Schörghuber)
Style: Doppelbock
Munich, Germany

bottled
common

on tap
common

Broad Distribution

Add Distribution Data
RATINGS: 2767   WEIGHTED AVG: 3.58/5   EST. CALORIES: 237   ABV: 7.9%
COMMERCIAL DESCRIPTION
The Paulaner Salvator with its strong,typically malty taste is the original Paulaner. The bottom-fermented Doppelbock-Bier unites the finest hops and dark barley malt. The Paulaner monks served Salvator as a replacement for food at Lent. Their most famous brewer was Brother Barnabas, who was the head of the Paulaner monastery brewery starting from 1773. Its original recipe is today almost the same as it was in Barnabas’ time. In order to protect the original recipe, Paulaner had the trade mark "Salvator" patented in 1896.

Original wort 18,3%
alcohol 7,9%
calories 68,0 kcal/100 m

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3.4
   AROMA 7/10   APPEARANCE 4/5   TASTE 7/10   PALATE 3/5   OVERALL 13/20
Rulymel (278) - SPAIN - JUL 7, 2014
Light brown colour with a nice white head. Aroma is malty, roasted, sweet, honey, alcohol, toffee Taste is malty, caramel, too much sweet and some alcohol. Hops is not enough to balance the taste, so drinking is too much sweet. Medium oily body. Good carbonation. Unbalanced

3.4
   AROMA 6/10   APPEARANCE 3/5   TASTE 6/10   PALATE 3/5   OVERALL 16/20
djaquay (138) - Ephrata, Pennsylvania, USA - JUL 25, 2014
Dark orange pour, thin head that went away quickly. But good flavor, nice strength.

3.4
   AROMA 6/10   APPEARANCE 3/5   TASTE 7/10   PALATE 4/5   OVERALL 14/20
momordgz (293) - - JUL 28, 2014
Lovely traditional dark amber beer with bitter taste and alcoholic flavor. Much better drink it on tap at Bavaria

3.4
   AROMA 7/10   APPEARANCE 3/5   TASTE 7/10   PALATE 4/5   OVERALL 13/20
lobs_ols (452) - LATVIA - AUG 24, 2014
Crimson on the eye, medium white head. Malt, caramel, and notes of alcohol on the nose. Smokey, with caramel, cellar and malt on the tongue. Warn malty finish. Good.

3.4
   AROMA 7/10   APPEARANCE 4/5   TASTE 7/10   PALATE 3/5   OVERALL 13/20
Alengrin (4900) - BELGIUM - AUG 27, 2014
UPDATED: OCT 28, 2016 The archetypical Doppelbock, as invented by the monks of Paula, the roots of the current Paulaner brewery, intended as ’liquid bread’ and having inspired all those other Doppelbocks with names ending in -ator (after the name ’Salvator’ had been copied many times and finally became a deposited trademark somewhere in the late 19the century). This was the first Doppelbock I ever tasted (and therefore a reference not just for the style as a whole, but for my personal appreciation of this style as well), from a ’tall boy’ can some twelve years ago, but since my palate must have evolved since then, I decided to put it to the test and re-rate it from its classic 50 cl bottle, bought at an Albert Heijn supermarket. Off-white, creamy, quite dense head leaving a thick, steady, moussy rim around the glass and thin patches of foam in the middle; lightly hazy, warm autumny amber-hued bronze colour, the archetypical looks of a Doppelbock. Aroma of butterscotch and caramel candy, wet towels and even vague wet dog, soggy sandwiches, dry autumn leaves, brown rum, butter melting on a hot pancake, burning brown sugar, something vaguely root-like (cooked chicory), sugared tea, dried fig, some toasted bread, roasted tomato peel but much less of the actual ripe tomato scent I remember it had from the can twelve years ago, hazelnut, mineral water, ’jenever’ and something - luckily - vaguely - and ’sulfurically’ - slurry pit-like. Sweetish onset with a sourish edge, no lively fruitiness so this is very clearly a lager, clean, with vague hints of dried fig, hazelnut and dried berries, vividly carbonated with a minerally effect, even numbing a little bit; smooth, full body, consisting of a full-fledged toffeeish and nutty maltiness, restrainedly sweetish but shifting to a mildly bittering ’toastedness’ in the end, faint metallic ’zing’ somewhere in the middle, leading to a malty finish in which the caramelly and toasted malt bittersweetness persists, quite one-sidedly so, but enriched with on the one hand a dash of herbal, almost tea-ish, but most of all rooty and lightly earthy hop bitterishness being subordinated to the malt character but serving its structural purposes very well, and on the other hand a glow of warming, subtly spicy, rum- or even brandy-like alcohol, which becomes a bit fatiguing in the end without descending into unpleasant astringency. This beer seems less interesting than I remember so my suspicion proves right: the can I had back then, bought at a - at that time! - novelty beer store in Rotterdam, harboured a somewhat more complex beer, with unexpected smoky and tomato-like accents, and those elements, which I was looking forward to revisiting, are as good as absent from this bottle. This is still very interesting, combining that typical wet kitchen towel-like aspect of so many lagers (regardless of style) with a deep, rounded, caramelly malt body, making it quite a saturating beer, as it ought to be with these strong, malty German beers. Salvator is to be respected as the grandfather of a style in much the same way as Hoegaarden is to be respected as the archetypical Belgian witbier: an influential standard, more suitable than anything to get acquainted with the particular style, but surpassed by many others since its creation; neglecting 21st-century craft beer innovations, I would e.g. place Andechser’s Doppelbock Dunkel (one of the exceptions in Germany in ignoring the -ator suffix) and Ayinger’s Celebrator, the two most famous classic Doppelbocks after this, above this Salvator in terms of refinement and richness. The alcohol could have been better hidden in this one and the sulfuric accent in the nose bothered me a bit as well. Huge respect for this beer, and glad I revisited it, but objectively reviewed, this is a very commercial example of the style in spite of its traditions, more on a par with e.g. Löwenbräu’s Triumphator and the like. And my final critical note: do not believe the story that this is still brewed according to the recipe of Paula’s friar Barnabas from 1773, as this industrial brewery would like you to believe: this beer is bottom-fermented, a practice that became generalized only in the first half of the 19th century. Maybe a top-fermented craft beer tribute to this very classic beer would not be such a bad idea?

3.3
   AROMA 6/10   APPEARANCE 3/5   TASTE 7/10   PALATE 3/5   OVERALL 14/20
Jimmylib (169) - old bridge, New Jersey, USA - JUN 21, 2000

3.3
   AROMA 7/10   APPEARANCE 3/5   TASTE 6/10   PALATE 3/5   OVERALL 14/20
weeicemon (126) - Lancaster, California, USA - MAR 23, 2001
This reminds of a very strong Marzen. It’s really a little lite (not on the alcohol) to be a dopplebock. Thick head followed by a an even prunish flavor. This beer supposidly is legendary in Germany. I had high hopes and while not bad, really didnt live up to the expectations.

3.3
   AROMA 7/10   APPEARANCE 4/5   TASTE 6/10   PALATE 3/5   OVERALL 13/20
delacerveza (166) - Florida, USA - JUL 24, 2001
man, this beer review stuff is weird...taste is so subjective after all! i wasn’t too gung ho for this beer, even though i love paulaner’s weisse beer. maybe that’s my ’problem’. with doubles and trippels and whatnot i get overwhelmed. i like and am used to drinking the lower alchohol, wheat syle beers. who knows, perhaps these types of beers will grow on me and i’ll ’graduate’ to the genre! evidently the dubbel that i REALLY DO like (flying fish) is somewhat weaker in flavor than the norm, so maybe i’m already on my way.....;)

3.3
   AROMA 7/10   APPEARANCE 4/5   TASTE 7/10   PALATE 3/5   OVERALL 12/20
motelpogo (7705) - Plzen, CZECH REPUBLIC - OCT 9, 2001
expected better. the aftertaste doesn’t really go anywhere and just tastes soggy

3.3
   AROMA 7/10   APPEARANCE 2/5   TASTE 7/10   PALATE 2/5   OVERALL 15/20
TAR (2708) - Marshall (Asheville area), North Carolina, USA - OCT 29, 2001
A very nice aroma, which includes alcohol and sweet fruits. A thinner body than I expected. An above average beer, after dinner or before bed.


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