Another lawsuit over beer names

Reads 2661 • Replies 18 • Started Thursday, March 28, 2013 9:12:50 AM CT

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Countbeer
beers 6554 º places 259 º 11:11 Thu 3/28/2013

This is so gay! Fuck man, beers are made to enjoy not to sue... (Where’s that cry emoticon?)

 
TheHOFF43
beers 2049 º places 169 º 11:17 Thu 3/28/2013

Originally posted by Countbeer
This is so gay! Fuck man, beers are made to enjoy not to sue... (Where’s that cry emoticon?)


Please explain how the sexual orientation of this matters

 
Countbeer
beers 6554 º places 259 º 11:56 Thu 3/28/2013

Originally posted by khoffman43
Originally posted by Countbeer
This is so gay! Fuck man, beers are made to enjoy not to sue... (Where’s that cry emoticon?)


Please explain how the sexual orientation of this matters

Nah it doesn’t, but it is like Dutch slang..
I don’t care about anybody’s sexual orientation, but it is used like this as well just to point out how sad this sue is!

 
after4ever
admin
beers 8019 º places 322 º 12:01 Thu 3/28/2013

This clearly looks like Lucette tried to ride Lift Bridge’s coattails. This isn’t a stupid oversight on their part. It’s deliberate.

Just because someone makes beer for a living doesn’t mean they’re incapable of this sort of thing. They might be nice people otherwise, but, on the merits, this seriously looks like they’re trying to cash in on Lift Bridge’s hard work building a brand. Not cool.

 
TheHOFF43
beers 2049 º places 169 º 12:05 Thu 3/28/2013

Lift Bridge isn’t a huge place but they are good people (from my experiences visiting their facility) and this is their most popular beer. Not that it is a hugely popular beer, but to lose sales and have that confusion hurts them.

Lucette could have avoided this, it seems intentional on their part.

 
callmemickey
beers 4531 º places 47 º 12:29 Thu 3/28/2013

Originally posted by GT2

They will win that claim without arbitration, and the other brewery only has to change label and name. Very easy, very low cost involved.





I am not sure what arbitration has to do with it, but yes, it is a fairly straight forward case. Especially since, if the article/Lift Bridge is to be believed, Lucette has taken additional steps to confuse the market since being approached by Lift Bridge.

 
CharmCityCrab
beers 244 º 14:01 Thu 3/28/2013

Originally posted by CLevar
My main question is this: How many sales (in either direction) resulted from this confusion? In the final analysis, I have a hard time believing that these sales would represent a large portion of the total market.


The article talks about the second brewer in trying to persuade bars to replace tap handles from the original beer to the newer one. My knowledge of the industry is limited, but my understanding is that tap handles represent hard to acquire bar "real estate" and could account for a large volume of sales. Plus, when you’re not staring at a label on a bottle or a can, it’s a lot easier to miss that you’re actually drinking a different beer that’s brewed in a similar way with a similar name, especially if the bartender is "in on" trying to create that confusion (You’d imagine with a switch from one to the other, the bartenders might just wind up serving up the newer beer whenever anyone asked for either one of them, and if someone noticed a different name on the handle say "It’s basically the same thing.).

If there wasn’t much money at stake here, I doubt the newer brewer would have bothered copying the name in the first place. It wouldn’t be worth the potential legal consequences. And they certainly wouldn’t have refused to make changes when the original brewery contacted them and tried to talk- why risk a law suit over something that’s not making you what you consider significant money? I mean, it’s probably not much money for larger brewers, but it might be make or break for these two microbreweries.

The original brewery did the hard work of establishing it’s branding and a customer base. The second brewery tried to steal them through stealth and deception. The second brewery has every right to try to win those beer drinkers over from the original brewer’s product, but it needs to do it fairly, with no intentionally confusing names or labeling. Name your beer something completely different with a distinctive label and go to work.

 
CLevar
places 20 º 15:24 Thu 3/28/2013

Originally posted by CharmCityCrab
Originally posted by CLevar
My main question is this: How many sales (in either direction) resulted from this confusion? In the final analysis, I have a hard time believing that these sales would represent a large portion of the total market.


The article talks about the second brewer in trying to persuade bars to replace tap handles from the original beer to the newer one. My knowledge of the industry is limited, but my understanding is that tap handles represent hard to acquire bar "real estate" and could account for a large volume of sales. Plus, when you’re not staring at a label on a bottle or a can, it’s a lot easier to miss that you’re actually drinking a different beer that’s brewed in a similar way with a similar name, especially if the bartender is "in on" trying to create that confusion (You’d imagine with a switch from one to the other, the bartenders might just wind up serving up the newer beer whenever anyone asked for either one of them, and if someone noticed a different name on the handle say "It’s basically the same thing.).



Sure, but that’s not on the consumer, but on the establishment that decides to make that move. If a bar wants to sell a similar beer, marketed to a similar audience, with a similar name, fine. I can see why it would be a good thing for that bar (at least in the short term) if they were able to get the beer on tap for a lower price, and sell it at the same price as the previous beer.