Australian gluten-free barley

Reads 565 • Replies 7 • Started Thursday, April 14, 2016 3:23:50 PM CT

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StefanSD
beers 2449 º places 57 º 15:23 Thu 4/14/2016

Apologize if this is old news:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/beer-brewers-toast-australian-gluten-free-barley-161636567.html?ref=gs

This seems promising, barley grown gluten free. The few gluten free beers that I’ve tried have been underwhelming at best. Perhaps things are looking up for this aspect of the industry.

 
Travlr
beers 30304 º places 3522 º 15:26 Thu 4/14/2016

is it genetically modified? I thought the Europeans had a GMO-phobia, and a German brewery is using this

 
StefanSD
beers 2449 º places 57 º 15:48 Thu 4/14/2016

Originally posted by Travlr
is it genetically modified? I thought the Europeans had a GMO-phobia, and a German brewery is using this


They claim its the result of selective cross breeding, not gene splicing. If so then it does not meet the definition of GMO.

 
Travlr
beers 30304 º places 3522 º 17:14 Thu 4/14/2016

Which I’ve never understood, because selective breeding is genetic modification, just in slow motion.

 
SpringsLicker
beers 3906 º places 158 º 17:52 Thu 4/14/2016

Originally posted by Travlr
Which I’ve never understood, because selective breeding is genetic modification, just in slow motion.


GMO doesn’t have to stay within species. You can splice a bacteria gene into a plant or a plant gene from a different species of plant.

 
StefanSD
beers 2449 º places 57 º 17:58 Thu 4/14/2016

Originally posted by SpringsLicker
Originally posted by Travlr
Which I’ve never understood, because selective breeding is genetic modification, just in slow motion.


GMO doesn’t have to stay within species. You can splice a bacteria gene into a plant or a plant gene from a different species of plant.


Correct. Thus the controversy. Some companies have experimented with placing genes from living creatures, say frogs for example, into corn to increase pest resistance. That is why they are occasionally referred to as Frankenfoods. So far they appear quite safe, but only time will tell for sure.

We drink a carcinogen every time we drink a beer. How safe is that?

 
humlelala
beers 1377 º places 89 º 04:20 Fri 4/15/2016

Yeah let’s just make it potentially even worse.