Baltic Porter and Imperial Porter , any difference ?

Reads 3106 • Replies 19 • Started Thursday, October 15, 2015 3:57:03 AM CT

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shobu1
beers 2 º places 1 º 03:57 Thu 10/15/2015

Hello , if anyone could tell me , what’s difference between , Baltic Porter and Imperial Porter ? Baltic Porter is lager style of beer , and Imperial Porter is one of the type Ale (surface fermentation) beer , like English Porter or it was the same style of beer ?

 
theisti
beers 4574 º places 1023 º 08:25 Thu 10/15/2015

My understanding is that Baltic Porter is more of the classic, strong lager Porter style - and that Imperial Porter was a moniker created later to encapsulate a wider variety (ale,lager) of strong porter type beers.

I’ll let those more knowledgeable give a deeper explanation.

 
fly
beers 1490 º places 273 º 09:01 Thu 10/15/2015

It has a slightly different accent. You have to really listen to it. The bubbles sound more Latvian than Russian.

 
Marko
beers 8462 º places 430 º 09:16 Thu 10/15/2015

Baltic Porters are stronger than average and brewed using lager yeast, or at cold fermented if using ale yeast. As simple as that. Other porters are ales.

 
phredrik
beers 1024 º places 31 º 09:24 Thu 10/15/2015

Originally posted by Marko
Baltic Porters are stronger than average and brewed using lager yeast, or at cold fermented if using ale yeast. As simple as that. Other porters are ales.

This.

And as another poster said before, Imperial Porter is just a moniker for porters that defy the style definition by being stronger and more potent (>8-ish %).
But obviously it gets tricky, as it is also often the brewer’s intent and definition that defines whether it is a Porter or Imperial Porter.

I believe the rules are a bit tighter when it comes to Baltic Porters, they have to be lager yeast fermented or ale yeast fermented at low temperatures.

 
fly
beers 1490 º places 273 º 09:25 Thu 10/15/2015

Originally posted by Marko
Baltic Porters are stronger than average and brewed using lager yeast, or at cold fermented if using ale yeast. As simple as that. Other porters are ales.



Perhaps I misread the chapter.

 
Beersiveknown
beers 5381 º places 178 º 09:25 Thu 10/15/2015

imperial porter=imperial stout=strong porter=strong stout

baltic porter=completely different

 
fiulijn
beers 25013 º places 725 º 02:33 Fri 10/16/2015

Originally posted by Beersiveknown
imperial porter=imperial stout=strong porter=strong stout

baltic porter=completely different

Someday we may discuss if there is a clear distinction in flavor between Imperial Stout and Imperial Porter besides the name given by the brewer, or if they overlap half of the times (hint: this), and merge the styles :-)

 
Christian
beers 15317 º places 278 º 03:24 Fri 10/16/2015

No porters are ales. Ales are ales, porters are black beers... In other words: "Ale" doesn’t just mean any top fermented beer.

Baltic porter: A bottom fermented strong black beer, originating in the countries around the baltic sea, inspired by the imported imperial stouts from England.

Imperial porter: Something written on American beer labels to signify a sweeter, less roasted imperial stout.

 
Inbreak
beers 9545 º 08:11 Fri 10/16/2015

Wrong. Ales are brewed using top fermentation, lagers are brewed using bottom fermentation. It’s as simple as that.

And in general, you’ll find baltic porters usually are at least a little, if not much more sweeter, and maybe with more licorice aroma / taste in it.

 
Beersiveknown
beers 5381 º places 178 º 08:14 Fri 10/16/2015

Originally posted by Inbreak
Wrong. Ales are brewed using top fermentation, lagers are brewed using bottom fermentation. It’s as simple as that.

And in general, you’ll find baltic porters usually are at least a little, if not much more sweeter, and maybe with more licorice aroma / taste in it.


not strictly true any more, many ale yeasts are now bottom fermenting