Brewer to brewer, Kolsch is indistinguishable

Reads 7826 • Replies 126 • Started Sunday, May 5, 2013 7:14:25 AM CT

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Originally posted by McTapps
Originally posted by Theydon_Bois
Was in Bochum last weekend and there was some kind of festival on. Ginger hairy piglets on display - never seen the like !


You have been in Bochum and haven’t drunk a Moritz Fiege at all? Unbelievable!


???

And how do you deduce this ?

 
McTapps
beers 6976 º places 194 º 14:16 Wed 5/8/2013

Originally posted by Theydon_Bois
Originally posted by McTapps
Originally posted by Theydon_Bois
Was in Bochum last weekend and there was some kind of festival on. Ginger hairy piglets on display - never seen the like !


You have been in Bochum and haven’t drunk a Moritz Fiege at all? Unbelievable!


???

And how do you deduce this ?


I’d deduce that you probably miss some nice beers ;-)

Alt, Pils, Grunde Helles, Schwarz were not missed.



My point being why do you presume I didn’t have them ?

 
McTapps
beers 6976 º places 194 º 14:30 Wed 5/8/2013

Was just looking at your ratings and haven’t seen anything else than Moritz Fiege Schwarz in your German beer ratings.

But am not looking for a public discussion, bp me if you have any issues ;-)

 
JK
beers 6295 º places 420 º 14:34 Wed 5/8/2013

Originally posted by robrules
>At the breweries, one fresh Kolsch is virtually indistinguishable from another. I could perceive little house character or differences between Paffgen, Muhlen, Sion, or Gaffel.



>Fresh Kolsch is substantially similar to well made but under-flavored yellow lager. There is a lack of complexity and variety to the style.



The second paragraph explains the first. If you can’t tell the difference between lager and kolsch you may want to drop all the flavor bombs you drink in the US and re-learn how to taste beer - from the ground up instead of top down this time.



And if you couldn’t tell the differences between the altbiers you had, your palate is quite suspect.




We just can’t help ourselves from making it personal, can we?

I said similar, not the same. Thanks.

Originally posted by McTapps
Was just looking at your ratings and haven’t seen anything else than Moritz Fiege Schwarz in your German beer ratings.

But am not looking for a public discussion, bp me if you have any issues ;-)


no issues - just wondered why you thought i didnt go to moritz f - it was the only reason we went to bochum!

112 ratings that weekend, back to work for 4 days, 30 or so rates last weekend - its a matter of finding the time to log the rates on here!

 
harrisoni
beers 19338 º places 37 º 14:51 Wed 5/8/2013

I went to Koln a few years back and could tell the difference between the Kolsch from different breweries. I look forward to going back next week and doing the same route. Sorry, I don’t have a strong opinion on what the OP said either way. I’ll make up my own mind next week.

 
McTapps
beers 6976 º places 194 º 14:51 Wed 5/8/2013

And I was just looking at your ratings ;-) sure, sometimes you just can’t find or get the time to rate.

Where was the festival you mentioned?

Originally posted by JK
Originally posted by robrules
>At the breweries, one fresh Kolsch is virtually indistinguishable from another. I could perceive little house character or differences between Paffgen, Muhlen, Sion, or Gaffel.



>Fresh Kolsch is substantially similar to well made but under-flavored yellow lager. There is a lack of complexity and variety to the style.



The second paragraph explains the first. If you can’t tell the difference between lager and kolsch you may want to drop all the flavor bombs you drink in the US and re-learn how to taste beer - from the ground up instead of top down this time.



And if you couldn’t tell the differences between the altbiers you had, your palate is quite suspect.




We just can’t help ourselves from making it personal, can we?

I said similar, not the same. Thanks.

What can you expect when you make judgments on entire styles of beer with their own history and tradition? I know it’s 2013, but these things matter to some people.

 
JK
beers 6295 º places 420 º 15:14 Wed 5/8/2013

Originally posted by ContemplateBeer
Originally posted by JK
Originally posted by robrules
>At the breweries, one fresh Kolsch is virtually indistinguishable from another. I could perceive little house character or differences between Paffgen, Muhlen, Sion, or Gaffel.



>Fresh Kolsch is substantially similar to well made but under-flavored yellow lager. There is a lack of complexity and variety to the style.



The second paragraph explains the first. If you can’t tell the difference between lager and kolsch you may want to drop all the flavor bombs you drink in the US and re-learn how to taste beer - from the ground up instead of top down this time.



And if you couldn’t tell the differences between the altbiers you had, your palate is quite suspect.




We just can’t help ourselves from making it personal, can we?

I said similar, not the same. Thanks.

What can you expect when you make judgments on entire styles of beer?


Reasonable discussion, I thought.