Cider and yeasts?

Reads 2386 • Replies 13 • Started Wednesday, January 6, 2016 4:56:21 PM CT

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Countbeer
beers 6587 º places 259 º 16:56 Wed 1/6/2016

When making cider, does it really matter what yeast you use, even if you make a starter?

 
Homer321
beers 5359 º places 54 º 17:00 Wed 1/6/2016

I imagine using a Belgian yeast strain might produce different flavoUrs than using a neutral American strain...

If you’re not fortifying the apple juice, I would think most (all?) strains could finish the juice down to 1.000

That being said I use Nottingham because I like the results and it is economical.

 
GarethYoung
beers 1111 º places 27 º 04:36 Thu 1/7/2016

It certainly matters in the sense that different strains will give you different flavours, but you can get good results from a lot of different strains.

For my palate, the best ciders are fermented spontaneously and have a lot of brettanomyces character. So you could pitch a saccharomyces strain of your choosing (I’d go with something Belgian and convenient, like Belle Saison) and pitch the dregs from a few different bottles of lambic. That gives you a bit of the funk characteristic of traditional ciders, though it’s not quite the same as spontaneous fermentation.

It depends a bit on your tastes, but I can’t think of any strains that would give particularly bad results, apart, maybe from Hefeweizen strains, and there would be no point in using lager strains. Apart from that, fire in.

 
mkgrenwel
beers 619 º places 117 º 08:57 Thu 1/7/2016

"Does it matter?" Of course. Just like it matters what strain you use in a beer. They’ll essentially all work but give yo different flavor profiles.

I’ve had really good results just utilizing the bugs that live on the apples. I took a gallon of cider and threw in a bunch of apple skins from the same orchard and let it go. When it was done I saved the dregs and have continued to brew cider with it.

 
Bacterial
beers 3140 º places 134 º 14:01 Thu 1/7/2016

made a cider recently with the white lab’s english cider yeast. Turned out really well, lots of apple in the nose.

 
cheap
beers 7618 º places 283 º 18:30 Thu 1/7/2016

"For my palate, the best ciders are fermented spontaneously"

I’ve had good luck with EC1118, epernay and lavin 47. But after reading this, and with more sour beers experience, I’d like to try the spontaneous, peels added or wild technique. The thought makes my mouth water.

 
MacBoost
beers 2068 º places 38 º 19:17 Thu 1/7/2016

I use redstar champagne for a super clean and dry cider (refermenting in bottle for carb). I also did a few batches with the roeselare blend with lactose added, let it go for a year and it was fantastic.

 
GarethYoung
beers 1111 º places 27 º 04:52 Fri 1/8/2016

Originally posted by cheap
"For my palate, the best ciders are fermented spontaneously"

I’ve had good luck with EC1118, epernay and lavin 47. But after reading this, and with more sour beers experience, I’d like to try the spontaneous, peels added or wild technique. The thought makes my mouth water.


With cider, much of the wild saccharomyces and brettanomyces comes from the cidery itself, the equipment and the barrels, so I don’t think just adding peel is likely to replicate that. It’s probably best to pitch a culture you know is good, or maybe just some yeast and bottle dregs. You could always supplement it with peel.

In general, I’m not a big advocate of spontaneous fermentation of booze at home. Generally the things which make them good in a commercial setting (big coolships or apple presses, lots of barrels, the possibility of significant blending, putting selective pressure on the resident bugs by throwing things out,etc.) aren’t really available at home.

 
Countbeer
beers 6587 º places 259 º 14:31 Fri 1/8/2016

Thanks for all info!
Of course I understand the flavour profile might differ with each yeast, but i meant more like is every yeast usable...
Planning on using different yeast (specially wild and funky) and different apples...
The apple peel sounds very interesting! Will be trying that too!
Thanks all!

 
skinnyguy
09:29 Wed 1/13/2016

I like to use beer yeast more than wine or champagne yeast, as it seems to retain more apple character. Windsor or other English strains work very well, though I also use American strains (1056, US-05).



Swirl the fermentor gently to help degas as the CO2 may inhibit complete fermentation, since the cider is not a great environment for beer yeast. Nutrients can help as well.

 
GarethYoung
beers 1111 º places 27 º 09:32 Wed 1/13/2016

I agree about nutrients, if you’re using straight saccharomyces, especially beer saccharomyces. But if you’re using a funky, mixed-culture, it might be an advantage not to. If your saccharomyces fermentation is incomplete, it will leave more sugars for brettanomyces (and perhaps other things) to ferment.

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