Cloudy Beer

Reads 3495 • Replies 27 • Started Friday, July 31, 2015 4:50:19 PM CT

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Fratto
beers 2845 º 16:50 Fri 7/31/2015

This time I want a cloudy beer. As murky and opaque as I can get while keeping a relatively light color. I can’t find anything in the way of making the beer cloudy. Just people being worried about beer being cloudy.

Yeast in suspension is helpful, but I don’t want it to settle out eventually. Maybe a higher than normal mash?

 
drowland
beers 11069 º places 430 º 17:12 Fri 7/31/2015

Call Toppling Goliath!

 
drowland
beers 11069 º places 430 º 17:13 Fri 7/31/2015

For serious, though, maybe look up about how to get rid of chill haze and then not do those things? Make a wheat beer maybe?

 
Fratto
beers 2845 º 17:24 Fri 7/31/2015

A wheat beer has definitely been the prevailing thought.

I hadn’t thought of just googling what not to do and then doing it. Interested in what comes of this one.

 
bitbucket
beers 2166 º places 63 º 23:48 Sun 8/2/2015

Originally posted by drowland
For serious, though, maybe look up about how to get rid of chill haze and then not do those things? Make a wheat beer maybe?

That’s an interesting thought. Chill haze, and the cloudiness of wheat beers come from proteins in suspension. The main thing you need to do for beer clarity is to quickly chill the wort. So don’t make any attempt to chill it... just let it cool off slowly. A short boil and some wheat should help as well.

 
GarethYoung
beers 1111 º places 27 º 06:25 Mon 8/3/2015

Most of the things that cause haze, like protein, cause a mild haziness, not the turbidity you’re looking for, which comes from yeast. If you stick a hefeweizen in the fridge for a few weeks then pour it without agitation, it will, at most, be mildly hazy.

I don’t know of any way to make turbidity like that genuinly permanent. You could always use a strain with poor flocculation then agitate it before drinking it.

One way to get a pretty cloudy beer that would last a long time would be starch. Stick some grain in a bag and dunk it in the kettle for a bit at the start of the boil. That might do it.

Why in God’s name you would want to do these things is completely beyond me, but agitating yeast beer and adding starch seem to me like the way to do it.

 
joeneugs
beers 6371 º places 241 º 09:49 Mon 8/3/2015

I would add a bunch of flaked barley and/or oats to the recipe along with using a less floculant yeast. No kettle finings either, obviously.

 
Fratto
beers 2845 º 07:08 Tue 8/4/2015

Originally posted by GarethYoung
Why in God’s name you would want to do these things is completely beyond me




I know, I know. Truth be told, I want to turn it blue.

 
skinnyguy
12:14 Tue 8/4/2015

<&#59;i>&#59;Originally posted by GarethYoung<&#59;/i>&#59;

Most of the things that cause haze, like protein, cause a mild haziness, not the turbidity you’re looking for, which comes from yeast. If you stick a hefeweizen in the fridge for a few weeks then pour it without agitation, it will, at most, be mildly hazy





If you let a couldy hefeweizen sit in the fridge long enough, it may even end up brilliantly clear -I’ve had that happen-.



The best way to serve it clouly is to make sure the yeast is mixed in at the time you serve it, and select a yeast that does not form a tight and compact yeast cake. Some breweries -such as Widmer- ask that their kegs of Hefeweizen be stored upside down and flipped right side up before tapping to re-suspend the yeast. Do that with the bottles.



You can also dry-hop the beer heavily to try and suspend more proteins.



Other attempts at adding haze may invite bacterial contamination, especially anything to do with adding or leaving behind starch.

 
joet
admin
beers 2898 º places 125 º 12:24 Tue 8/4/2015

perfectly cloudy and brilliant with no unsightly clumps can be an achievement

 
NobleSquirrel
beers 3437 º places 209 º 08:24 Wed 8/5/2015

Other tricks are to add baking flour to boil. It’s an old trick in homebrew books for making witbier look cloudy.

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