Cloudy Beer

Reads 3493 • Replies 27 • Started Friday, July 31, 2015 4:50:19 PM CT

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SamGamgee
beers 2452 º places 182 º 02:14 Sat 8/8/2015

We ship our hefe kegs upside down so they get flipped when they are tapped. Reliable haze achieved... All beer gets clear with enough time, I think. My tip if you are looking for the best beer... don’t worry about appearance..

 
GarethYoung
beers 1111 º places 27 º 17:54 Sun 8/9/2015

Originally posted by SamGamgee
My tip if you are looking for the best beer... don’t worry about appearance..


This is a bit of a derailment, but I hear this a fair bit, and I totally disagree with it.

One of the big things coming from the scientific work on the sensory aspects of food and drink is just how much stuff other than the pure flavour and aroma molecules in your glass, or on your plate, affects the smell and taste of the things we consume (or, less controversially, our judgments about those things). The way things look profoundly affects the way they taste (or, at least, how we judge them to taste). You can make wine tasters report red wine flavours, rather than white wine flavours, by putting odourless colouring in white wine. You can make beer tasters report stout flavours, rather than pale ale flavours, by putting odourless colouring in pale ale. People consistently report that a beer with persistent foam tastes better than one without, even when the beers are otherwise identical. People prefer things that they are told are more expensive, that come in fancier packaging, with fancier labels.

There are tons and tons of results like this. Given all that stuff, if you want to make the best beer you can, it seems to me that you should care about appearance very much.

I care about, and want to have control over, every aspect of the beer I make. I wouldn’t use an additive that made my beer clear at the cost of making it smell like shit, so I prioritise some things over others, but I care a lot about the way a beer looks, and I think anyone who cares about making the best beer they can should do the same.

 
johnnnniee
beers 6019 º places 209 º 19:25 Thu 8/20/2015

Add some pectin or boil some fruit in your beer? That should make some cloudy.

Cheers,
John


Originally posted by Fratto
This time I want a cloudy beer. As murky and opaque as I can get while keeping a relatively light color. I can’t find anything in the way of making the beer cloudy. Just people being worried about beer being cloudy.

Yeast in suspension is helpful, but I don’t want it to settle out eventually. Maybe a higher than normal mash?

 
SamGamgee
beers 2452 º places 182 º 09:25 Fri 8/21/2015

Originally posted by GarethYoung
Originally posted by SamGamgee
My tip if you are looking for the best beer... don’t worry about appearance..


This is a bit of a derailment, but I hear this a fair bit, and I totally disagree with it.

One of the big things coming from the scientific work on the sensory aspects of food and drink is just how much stuff other than the pure flavour and aroma molecules in your glass, or on your plate, affects the smell and taste of the things we consume (or, less controversially, our judgments about those things). The way things look profoundly affects the way they taste (or, at least, how we judge them to taste). You can make wine tasters report red wine flavours, rather than white wine flavours, by putting odourless colouring in white wine. You can make beer tasters report stout flavours, rather than pale ale flavours, by putting odourless colouring in pale ale. People consistently report that a beer with persistent foam tastes better than one without, even when the beers are otherwise identical. People prefer things that they are told are more expensive, that come in fancier packaging, with fancier labels.

There are tons and tons of results like this. Given all that stuff, if you want to make the best beer you can, it seems to me that you should care about appearance very much.

I care about, and want to have control over, every aspect of the beer I make. I wouldn’t use an additive that made my beer clear at the cost of making it smell like shit, so I prioritise some things over others, but I care a lot about the way a beer looks, and I think anyone who cares about making the best beer they can should do the same.



Was mainly truing to say that favor and aroma should drive appearance which I think in many cases means a pretty clear beer if not always totally bright. I do think that excessive haze and turbidity often lead to poorer flavor and mouthfeel and also age much worse. The more shit you have in your beer, the more things are going to oxidize and give more off flavors.

 
DietPepsican
beers 1592 º places 63 º 09:43 Fri 8/21/2015

Appearance certainly drives expectations. I’m damn near the point that when I see a perfectly clear hoopy beer (pales, indias) I start to question if it’s going to be any good. It’s like when you see one that is dark like Sierra Nevada pale. Instantly start to wonder if it’s just going to be bitter malt.

 
BMan1113VR
beers 7929 º places 423 º 13:42 Fri 8/21/2015

I was going to suggest flour as well and enzymes and Tanal A (which have already been mentioned). Kerry Biocloud is another product that would work (you might be able to get that through BSG’s homebrewing division)

Oldsock also has written about hazy beer recently
http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2015/08/apricot-atomic-sour-smoothie-tasting.html
http://www.themadfermentationist.com/2015/06/hop-juice-north-east-ipa-recipe.html

Setting pectin with fruit (add to WP/Kettle) or using a strain like 3711/several brett strains will also get you a pretty murky/muddy/turbid beer. You could also manipulate the mash to produce chill haze, use less calcium (oxolate haze) and no YX to slow flocculation. Grist choice and more dry hops for polyphenol based haze.

I wouldn’t really recommend any of these things though...

 
GlasgowTAD
beers 2015 º places 38 º 15:00 Fri 8/21/2015

Originally posted by GarethYoung
Originally posted by SamGamgee
My tip if you are looking for the best beer... don’t worry about appearance..


This is a bit of a derailment, but I hear this a fair bit, and I totally disagree with it.

One of the big things coming from the scientific work on the sensory aspects of food and drink is just how much stuff other than the pure flavour and aroma molecules in your glass, or on your plate, affects the smell and taste of the things we consume (or, less controversially, our judgments about those things). The way things look profoundly affects the way they taste (or, at least, how we judge them to taste). You can make wine tasters report red wine flavours, rather than white wine flavours, by putting odourless colouring in white wine. You can make beer tasters report stout flavours, rather than pale ale flavours, by putting odourless colouring in pale ale. People consistently report that a beer with persistent foam tastes better than one without, even when the beers are otherwise identical. People prefer things that they are told are more expensive, that come in fancier packaging, with fancier labels.




I had experienced this when I had Beer Geek Daydream (A white stout - http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/mikkeller--siren-beer-geek-daydream/293170/), I picked up a lot of fruity aromas, as well as other aromas that my mind would associate with Pales or IPAs and, consciously, filtered them out in favour of ones that were more common to stouts. Des criptions of aroma for that beer range from smoke to vinegar.

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