Disputin’

Reads 9825 • Replies 56 • Started Tuesday, November 24, 2009 1:32:45 PM CT

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DYCSoccer17
beers 3745 º places 343 º 18:14 Tue 11/24/2009

I think North Coast has a right to defend their product, and they should in this case.

It’s another brewery brewing the same style of beer that the original Old Rasputin is, with the same name.

Because Old Rasputin has been long regarded as one of the top beers in the world, North Coast has earned the right to bitch about this.

Try making a hoppy barleywine called "Old Bigfoot" and see what Sierra Nevada does...

 
17thfloor
beers 2444 º places 19 º 18:19 Tue 11/24/2009

eh... but legally the "style" of beer has absolutely nothing to do with it...

Rasputin is tied to RIS’s because that is whom the beer was initial brewed for... it is inherently attached to the style... basically almost as a descriptor. Descriptor’s cannot be trademarked.
North Coast in a way has transposed the descriptor into a trademarkable name because NC is the most prolific one to use it... kind of crappy IMO

if there were more than 5 or 6 breweries (still) using the name Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout... then North Coast would have absolutely no case... mere posture and scare tactics... unfortunately I see this one working.

 
17thfloor
beers 2444 º places 19 º 18:21 Tue 11/24/2009

try and see them pull this shit with "Old Stock" .... bah

 
DYCSoccer17
beers 3745 º places 343 º 18:24 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by 17thfloor
eh... but legally the "style" of beer has absolutely nothing to do with it...

Rasputin is tied to RIS’s because that is whom the beer was initial brewed for... it is inherently attached to the style... basically almost as a descriptor. Descriptor’s cannot be trademarked.
North Coast in a way has transposed the descriptor into a trademarkable name because NC is the most prolific one to use it... kind of crappy IMO

if there were more than 5 or 6 breweries (still) using the name Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout... then North Coast would have absolutely no case... mere posture and scare tactics... unfortunately I see this one working.


I still don’t understand why you can’t understand North Coast’s stance . They have a quality product that has been around for many years. It is well established and well known. It is likely the highest selling Imperial Stout in the country’s history.

Do you think Chevrolet would be cool with another manufacturer calling their sports car model a "Corvet" or "Corvesse"?

 
BlackForestCO
beers 978 º places 18 º 18:34 Tue 11/24/2009

Whiny foreign bitches.

 
TheBeerSommelier
18:35 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by DYCSoccer17
I think North Coast has a right to defend their product, and they should in this case.

It’s another brewery brewing the same style of beer that the original Old Rasputin is, with the same name.

Because Old Rasputin has been long regarded as one of the top beers in the world, North Coast has earned the right to bitch about this.

Try making a hoppy barleywine called "Old Bigfoot" and see what Sierra Nevada does...


Absolutely.

 
puzzl
beers 3258 º places 138 º 18:36 Tue 11/24/2009

lame

 
puzzl
beers 3258 º places 138 º 18:38 Tue 11/24/2009

I’d expect this out of Dogfish or Stone but not North Coast, they’ve always had a better, less corporate vibe to me. Guess not.

Are there still people out there who deny that there are any "micros" out there that are greedy businesses and not community friends like we like to believe?

 
17thfloor
beers 2444 º places 19 º 18:38 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by DYCSoccer17
Originally posted by 17thfloor
eh... but legally the "style" of beer has absolutely nothing to do with it...

Rasputin is tied to RIS’s because that is whom the beer was initial brewed for... it is inherently attached to the style... basically almost as a descriptor. Descriptor’s cannot be trademarked.
North Coast in a way has transposed the descriptor into a trademarkable name because NC is the most prolific one to use it... kind of crappy IMO

if there were more than 5 or 6 breweries (still) using the name Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout... then North Coast would have absolutely no case... mere posture and scare tactics... unfortunately I see this one working.


I still don’t understand why you can’t understand North Coast’s stance . They have a quality product that has been around for many years. It is well established and well known. It is likely the highest selling Imperial Stout in the country’s history.

Do you think Chevrolet would be cool with another manufacturer calling their sports car model a "Corvet" or "Corvesse"?


I totally understand their issue. From a business standpoint it is not only wise but necessary.

 
TheBeerSommelier
18:44 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by 17thfloor
eh... but legally the "style" of beer has absolutely nothing to do with it...

Rasputin is tied to RIS’s because that is whom the beer was initial brewed for... it is inherently attached to the style... basically almost as a descriptor. Descriptor’s cannot be trademarked.
North Coast in a way has transposed the descriptor into a trademarkable name because NC is the most prolific one to use it... kind of crappy IMO

if there were more than 5 or 6 breweries (still) using the name Rasputin Russian Imperial Stout... then North Coast would have absolutely no case... mere posture and scare tactics... unfortunately I see this one working.


It has less to do with style, than confusion in the marketplace. The fact that both beers’ styles are the same makes North Coast’s case all the stronger. They originated and proliferated the name, through lots of expensive marketing, advertising and promotion. It’s theirs.

Open your own company some day and originate a name of your own. Then see how you feel, after years of building said successful business, when some upstart company uses your company or product name...simply because they think they can get away with it. How would you feel?

Fortunately, there are laws protecting those in the business community who’ve worked hard to make a name for themselves and their products, from those who would attempt to make a name for themselves on the basis of said hard work.