Disputin’

Reads 9834 • Replies 56 • Started Tuesday, November 24, 2009 1:32:45 PM CT

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17thfloor
beers 2444 º places 19 º 18:44 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by 17thfloor
try and see them pull this shit with "Old Stock" .... bah


North Coast doesn’t currently have a trademark or application pending for "Old Stock" ....

 
TheBeerSommelier
18:47 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by puzzl
I’d expect this out of Dogfish or Stone but not North Coast, they’ve always had a better, less corporate vibe to me. Guess not.

Are there still people out there who deny that there are any "micros" out there that are greedy businesses and not community friends like we like to believe?


Where the hell do you think you live...Communist Russia? This ain’t no kibbutz, where the lazy and thieving can simply steal product names.

What’s mine is mine and what’s yours is mine, huh?

 
TheBeerSommelier
18:48 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by 17thfloor
Originally posted by 17thfloor
try and see them pull this shit with "Old Stock" .... bah


North Coast doesn’t currently have a trademark or application pending for "Old Stock" ....


Wouldn’t much matter.

They’ve got years of public use behind them. They still own the name.

 
17thfloor
beers 2444 º places 19 º 18:50 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier


It has less to do with style, than confusion in the marketplace. The fact that both beers’ styles are the same makes North Coast’s case all the stronger. They originated and proliferated the name, through lots of expensive marketing, advertising and promotion. It’s theirs.

Open your own company some day and originate a name of your own. Then see how you feel, after years of building said successful business, when some upstart company uses your company or product name...simply because they think they can get away with it. How would you feel?

Fortunately, there are laws protecting those in the business community who’ve worked hard to make a name for themselves and their products, from those who would attempt to make a name for themselves on the basis of said hard work.



??? yea... my only point was that you cannot trademark descriptors... and Rasputin is not an ordinary mark... on top of that it is an historical figure, however, just like you said (and I also said in previous posts) through "proliferation" they have made it their own. I was never condescending in my comments, so no need for you to be in yours.

 
17thfloor
beers 2444 º places 19 º 18:51 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier
Originally posted by 17thfloor
Originally posted by 17thfloor
try and see them pull this shit with "Old Stock" .... bah


North Coast doesn’t currently have a trademark or application pending for "Old Stock" ....


Wouldn’t much matter.

They’ve got years of public use behind them. They still own the name.


They could trademark North Coast Old Stock, but that would not prevent any other brewery from making Brewery X Old Stock... Old Stock is a commonly accepted ’descriptor’ that is untrademarkable...

 
satan165
beers 1021 º places 102 º 18:53 Tue 11/24/2009

its so cliched with all the talk about corporate greed

like north coast is a monolith about to get investigated for microsoft style anti-trust laws

they are trying to protect their investment -- which is why they acquired a trademark in the first place

anyone out there please set the new standard of opening a brewery and when your product starts to move pull all your trademarks and let any douchebag brewers out there bite chunks off your beer names and labels and everything else

stop thinking that people interested in beer are the only people that buy beer

yes, it is possible to have consumer confusion in a retail store

im not saying de molen was outright trying to get in on north coast’s action, and maybe he never even heard of north coast and had no clue and was genuinely surprised

if so, whats the big deal? this will be a new beer for the US anyways so it shouldnt hurt his sales, he didnt have to rebrand an existing beer

 
TheBeerSommelier
18:54 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by 17thfloor
Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier


It has less to do with style, than confusion in the marketplace. The fact that both beers’ styles are the same makes North Coast’s case all the stronger. They originated and proliferated the name, through lots of expensive marketing, advertising and promotion. It’s theirs.

Open your own company some day and originate a name of your own. Then see how you feel, after years of building said successful business, when some upstart company uses your company or product name...simply because they think they can get away with it. How would you feel?

Fortunately, there are laws protecting those in the business community who’ve worked hard to make a name for themselves and their products, from those who would attempt to make a name for themselves on the basis of said hard work.



??? yea... my only point was that you cannot trademark descriptors... and Rasputin is not an ordinary mark... on top of that it is an historical figure, however, just like you said (and I also said in previous posts) through "proliferation" they have made it their own. I was never condescending in my comments, so no need for you to be in yours.


I don’t think I was being condescending at all...simply voicing an opinion, by presenting a personal example.

 
17thfloor
beers 2444 º places 19 º 18:56 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier
Originally posted by 17thfloor
Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier


It has less to do with style, than confusion in the marketplace. The fact that both beers’ styles are the same makes North Coast’s case all the stronger. They originated and proliferated the name, through lots of expensive marketing, advertising and promotion. It’s theirs.

Open your own company some day and originate a name of your own. Then see how you feel, after years of building said successful business, when some upstart company uses your company or product name...simply because they think they can get away with it. How would you feel?

Fortunately, there are laws protecting those in the business community who’ve worked hard to make a name for themselves and their products, from those who would attempt to make a name for themselves on the basis of said hard work.



??? yea... my only point was that you cannot trademark descriptors... and Rasputin is not an ordinary mark... on top of that it is an historical figure, however, just like you said (and I also said in previous posts) through "proliferation" they have made it their own. I was never condescending in my comments, so no need for you to be in yours.


I don’t think I was being condescending at all...simply voicing an opinion, by presenting a personal example.


good deal, I think I just felt that way because you replied to me, but nowhere did I say anything contrary to what you were saying, I agree with you

 
Davinci
beers 295 º places 10 º 18:57 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by satan165
... he didnt have to rebrand an existing beer




It’s been brewed since 2007 and imported for about two years.

 
TheBeerSommelier
18:57 Tue 11/24/2009

Originally posted by 17thfloor
Originally posted by TheBeerSommelier
Originally posted by 17thfloor
Originally posted by 17thfloor
try and see them pull this shit with "Old Stock" .... bah


North Coast doesn’t currently have a trademark or application pending for "Old Stock" ....


Wouldn’t much matter.

They’ve got years of public use behind them. They still own the name.


They could trademark North Coast Old Stock, but that would not prevent any other brewery from making Brewery X Old Stock... Old Stock is a commonly accepted ’descriptor’ that is untrademarkable...



I don’t think so. I not only think it’s trademarkable, via not being sufficiently vague, I think many beer "styles" are probably more trademarkable than you’d think.

We’re a very small part of the general public, which is the standard - how it applies to the general public at large.