English Pale ale

Reads 2485 • Replies 59 • Started Thursday, November 2, 2017 1:22:02 PM CT

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cgarvieuk
beers 32090 º places 453 º 12:11 Sat 11/4/2017

Originally posted by harrisoni
Originally posted by chriso
I think moving to a single Pale Ale style would go a long way to addressing these issues.


I knew if I kept at it I'd convince you that all beers are pale ales.......

Only joking.




:-)

 
BVery
beers 13310 º places 748 º 12:13 Sat 11/4/2017

I like the use of the EPA style indicator. It's the equivalent for me of a Mr. Yuck sticker, comes in quite handy.

 
slowrunner77
beers 17365 º places 500 º 12:27 Sat 11/4/2017

LOL

Originally posted by BVery
I like the use of the EPA style indicator. It's the equivalent for me of a Mr. Yuck sticker, comes in quite handy.

 
danlo
beers 5764 º places 300 º 15:46 Sat 11/4/2017

Originally posted by harrisoni

IPA is also a catch all style that works. Doesn't matter the country, the hops. The same could be done for Pale Ales.


Apart from English IPA which are classed as Premium bitter/ESB on ratebeer, which is a trademark infringement in the UK apparently

 
LazyPyro
beers 4167 º places 58 º 16:58 Sat 11/4/2017

Can't we just use a hierarchy of styles to avoid all these kinds of arguments? The main style would just be a broad catch-all type thing, with an optional substyle (always used where possible)

Example:

Lager
-- Pale
-- India Style
India Pale Ale
-- American
-- Belgian
-- English
-- New England
-- International (catch-all for Aus/NZ/SA hopped ones and others)
-- Imperial/Double
Stout
-- Sweet/Milk
-- Imperial
Pale Ale
-- American
-- English
-- International
Belgian Ale
...... and so on. I won't bother listing every single style but you get the idea.

 
ebone1988
beers 2500 º places 25 º 17:06 Sat 11/4/2017

In the hierarchy of styles, you'd only have Lager, Ale, and Lambic. All beers are variations of that.

 
BlackHaddock
beers 10227 º places 821 º 17:23 Sat 11/4/2017

This post is not going to help 'the outcome' if in fact there is one.

When I first started drinking (Fakenham, Norfolk; 1969) as an under age 17 year old (don't ask what I was doing out in rural Norfolk), all my mates and I would order a half-pint of draught Bitter and a bottle of Pale Ale. The reason being we got more than half a pint of draught in the glass and we thought we were being clever. I honestly don't think the bottle of Pale Ale tasted anything like the cask draught we poured it into, even though the brewery must have been the same.

<*))))))><

 
harrisoni
beers 22641 º places 65 º 18:23 Sat 11/4/2017

Originally posted by ebone1988
In the hierarchy of styles, you'd only have Lager, Ale, an5d Lambic. All beers are variations of that.


So in fact the yeast is the deciding factor?
Interesting and you aren't the only one with a similar opinion.
Oh and there arent 76 styles of beer. No matter what RB says
I once promised never to contribute to a beer style subject forum thread again but i just cant help myself.

 
harrisoni
beers 22641 º places 65 º 18:25 Sat 11/4/2017

Originally posted by danlo
Originally posted by harrisoni

IPA is also a catch all style that works. Doesn't matter the country, the hops. The same could be done for Pale Ales.


Apart from English IPA which are classed as Premium bitter/ESB on ratebeer, which is a trademark infringement in the UK apparently


Oooh interesting. How would you describe or identify an English IPA?

 
ebone1988
beers 2500 º places 25 º 19:07 Sat 11/4/2017

Originally posted by harrisoni
Originally posted by ebone1988
In the hierarchy of styles, you'd only have Lager, Ale, and Lambic. All beers are variations of that.


So in fact the yeast is the deciding factor?
Interesting and you aren't the only one with a similar opinion.
Oh and there arent 76 styles of beer. No matter what RB says
I once promised never to contribute to a beer style subject forum thread again but i just cant help myself.


I mean one is top-fermented, one is bottom fermented, and one is open-fermented. I agree with classifying the different styles, some seem ambiguous.