Making your hoppy beers hoppier with less hops

Reads 3776 • Replies 33 • Started Friday, March 3, 2017 3:14:54 PM CT

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HornyDevil
07:13 Tue 3/7/2017

Originally posted by Homer321
Keep at 180F for an hour?! Any recommendations on how to do that for a homebrew scale? A low heat?


You don’t have to keep it there, but if you add your hops around 180F and just let the kettle stand for an hour, you shouldn’t get that much of a drop in temperature.

 
konstifik
beers 573 º places 37 º 02:06 Wed 3/8/2017

Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by konstifik
Interesting! How much of a difference does it make? Is this something that has the potential to become widespread in commercial brewing?


IMO, the difference is appreciable.

As far as its potential in commercial brewing goes, I think it has a lot of potential. Yeast is the new frontier of brewing. It’s just going to take a while for brewers to catch on as to how to use all the new yeast (Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces, including Brettanomyces, species) and bacteria that are out there on the market.


Cool! Looking forward to see if any of our domestic brewers will try this out.

Have you done any trials to see how stable these compounds are over time? Will hoppy beers made this way retain their fruity taste/aroma for longer (or shorter) than beers that are fermented with Saccharomyces only?

 
HornyDevil
06:17 Wed 3/8/2017

Originally posted by konstifik
Have you done any trials to see how stable these compounds are over time? Will hoppy beers made this way retain their fruity taste/aroma for longer (or shorter) than beers that are fermented with Saccharomyces only?


Sadly, hop aroma is still based on rather volatile chemicals, so even with the addition of these new types of yeast, it’s still better to consume hop-forward beer quickly.

In the limited work that I’ve done with the yeasts, I’d say that, at best, you might get a small increase in longevity of hop aroma and flavor. IMO, the reason to use these yeasts is that you can get commensurate hop flavor and aroma from a smaller amount of hops, and that flavor and aroma will be more varied/complex than if you only used a "normal" saccharomyces strain in your fermentation.

 
konstifik
beers 573 º places 37 º 08:20 Wed 3/8/2017

Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by konstifik
Have you done any trials to see how stable these compounds are over time? Will hoppy beers made this way retain their fruity taste/aroma for longer (or shorter) than beers that are fermented with Saccharomyces only?


Sadly, hop aroma is still based on rather volatile chemicals, so even with the addition of these new types of yeast, it’s still better to consume hop-forward beer quickly.

In the limited work that I’ve done with the yeasts, I’d say that, at best, you might get a small increase in longevity of hop aroma and flavor. IMO, the reason to use these yeasts is that you can get commensurate hop flavor and aroma from a smaller amount of hops, and that flavor and aroma will be more varied/complex than if you only used a "normal" saccharomyces strain in your fermentation.


Thanks for your answers and thanks for sharing!

 
dchmela
beers 3095 º places 108 º 08:52 Wed 3/8/2017

Awesome information, looking forward to trying this!

 
thepatrickman
beers 1503 º places 41 º 09:01 Wed 3/8/2017

Great information -- I love seeing entirely new techniques like this come out. Thanks for doing all this research.

 
JulienHuxley
beers 6219 º places 450 º 13:08 Wed 3/8/2017

Will definitely try this and report back

 
HornyDevil
13:19 Wed 3/8/2017

Originally posted by JulienHuxley
Will definitely try this and report back


If you have questions, please ask. I think you’ll be happy with your results.

 
JulienHuxley
beers 6219 º places 450 º 09:51 Thu 3/9/2017

Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by JulienHuxley
Will definitely try this and report back


If you have questions, please ask. I think you’ll be happy with your results.


Sure thing. First question, what’s your pitch rate on the wine yeast? How many packets/5gal?

 
HornyDevil
10:59 Thu 3/9/2017

Originally posted by JulienHuxley
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Originally posted by JulienHuxley
Will definitely try this and report back


If you have questions, please ask. I think you’ll be happy with your results.


Sure thing. First question, what’s your pitch rate on the wine yeast? How many packets/5gal?


I’d pitch what amounts to 2 packets, so around 23 grams or so, per 5 gallons.

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