NE Style IPA Recipe

Reads 2883 • Replies 12 • Started Wednesday, November 30, 2016 9:01:06 PM CT

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Macegan75
beers 869 º places 30 º 21:01 Wed 11/30/2016

Hi All,

Does anyone have an all grain recipe for brewing a New England Style IPA that they are willing share. I appreciate the help.

Cheers

Sean


 
MonsterMagnet
beers 1952 º places 15 º 23:23 Wed 11/30/2016

I’m working on one, but it’s not done and I haven’t brewed it yet, so I can’t tell you if it’s any good. I’ve picked up bits and pieces and put them together.

I found this to be a informative article: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/how-to-brew/tips-brewing-new-england-ipa/

My current state of recipe:
malt bill: 88% Maris Otter, 5% oat malt, 5% wheat, 2% acidulated malt
Single infusion mash: high (67C ) for some residual sweetness
Hops: a shitload, I’m going for a Galaxy/Enigma/Citra combo, select fruity, oily hops. I’m targeting to use around 400g for 20 liter (!).
Hop schedule: I’m probably going for 4 or 5 equal additions: 5-10mins left in the boil, whirlpool, _during_ primary fermenation and a regular dry hop after fermenation. So no bittering addition. I may do a 2nd regular dry hop addition (for 5 additionas total).
Water profile: favour Cl to So4 (probably going 4:3 ratio), water around 5.3pH for mashing

Feedback appreciated!

 
Erlangernick
beers 6 º places 2 º 02:42 Thu 12/1/2016

I long for the days when "NE IPA" meant a brown ale redolent of dirty gym socks, butterscotch, and twigs.

 
GarethYoung
beers 1111 º places 27 º 03:29 Thu 12/1/2016

Originally posted by MonsterMagnet
I’m working on one, but it’s not done and I haven’t brewed it yet, so I can’t tell you if it’s any good. I’ve picked up bits and pieces and put them together.

I found this to be a informative article: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/how-to-brew/tips-brewing-new-england-ipa/

My current state of recipe:
malt bill: 88% Maris Otter, 5% oat malt, 5% wheat, 2% acidulated malt
Single infusion mash: high (67C ) for some residual sweetness
Hops: a shitload, I’m going for a Galaxy/Enigma/Citra combo, select fruity, oily hops. I’m targeting to use around 400g for 20 liter (!).
Hop schedule: I’m probably going for 4 or 5 equal additions: 5-10mins left in the boil, whirlpool, _during_ primary fermenation and a regular dry hop after fermenation. So no bittering addition. I may do a 2nd regular dry hop addition (for 5 additionas total).
Water profile: favour Cl to So4 (probably going 4:3 ratio), water around 5.3pH for mashing

Feedback appreciated!


This looks pretty good to me. Personally, I go for a Maris Otter/Oat mix somewhere between 80%/20% and 90%/10%. I use the same volume of hops as well.

As for when the hops are added, I do similarly, but not quite the same. I add a very small amount of hops at the start of the boil, since I think it helps with boil-overs. I’m wary of doing more than one addition after the yeast has been added, because it lets oxygen in, which is an absolute killer of hop aroma. If you have the kit necessary to eliminate this, you should be fine though.

I do think adding hops during primary (assuming you mean somewhere in the middle of it) is a bit of a waste, since you’ll get a lot of blow-off of aromatics. If you dry hop right at the end of fermentation while there’s still a bit of activity, you should still get the aromatic conversions you want without unnecessary blow-off.

 
574deadzone
beers 1420 º places 11 º 06:08 Thu 12/1/2016

Originally posted by Erlangernick
I long for the days when "NE IPA" meant a brown ale redolent of dirty gym socks, butterscotch, and twigs.


Ah, the good old days!

 
Macegan75
beers 869 º places 30 º 10:12 Thu 12/1/2016

Thanks, guys

 
Macegan75
beers 869 º places 30 º 10:14 Thu 12/1/2016

Thanks, guys

 
MonsterMagnet
beers 1952 º places 15 º 00:53 Fri 12/2/2016

Originally posted by GarethYoung
I do think adding hops during primary (assuming you mean somewhere in the middle of it) is a bit of a waste, since you’ll get a lot of blow-off of aromatics. If you dry hop right at the end of fermentation while there’s still a bit of activity, you should still get the aromatic conversions you want without unnecessary blow-off.
I’ve read somewhere that the interaction of hops during primary (vigorous) fermentation leads to a much more ’juicy’ beer, so that’s the rationale behind that. It probably won’t contribute that much to the aroma (will be blown off), so that’s why I’m thinking of a second regular dry hop addition. And of course it will give me a hop high and fuzzy feelings when I open the fermentation chamber :-)

 
Homer321
beers 5359 º places 54 º 03:48 Fri 12/2/2016

Originally posted by MonsterMagnet
I’ve read somewhere that the interaction of hops during primary (vigorous) fermentation leads to a much more ’juicy’ beer, so that’s the rationale behind that.

This. Although completely counter intuitive. I added some dry hops around the third or fourth day of fermentation. Maybe an ounce for 5 gallons. It was much better than the batch that wasn’t hopped during fermentation.

 
GarethYoung
beers 1111 º places 27 º 05:48 Fri 12/2/2016

Originally posted by MonsterMagnet
Originally posted by GarethYoung
I do think adding hops during primary (assuming you mean somewhere in the middle of it) is a bit of a waste, since you’ll get a lot of blow-off of aromatics. If you dry hop right at the end of fermentation while there’s still a bit of activity, you should still get the aromatic conversions you want without unnecessary blow-off.
I’ve read somewhere that the interaction of hops during primary (vigorous) fermentation leads to a much more ’juicy’ beer, so that’s the rationale behind that. It probably won’t contribute that much to the aroma (will be blown off), so that’s why I’m thinking of a second regular dry hop addition. And of course it will give me a hop high and fuzzy feelings when I open the fermentation chamber :-)


I’m not a bit fan of this ’juicy’ descriptor that’s doing the rounds right now. It’s a marketing phrase, I think, rather than a description that usefully gets at anything involved in making (or even tasting) beer. It’s beers with fairly high sweetness, low bitterness and lots of fruit-forward hop aromas (often combined with absurd turbidity, but I won’t get in a rant about that).

Fermentation is involved in the production of some hop-derived aromatic compounds, which is the reason for dry-hopping while there’s still fermentation activity doing on. Like I said, hopping during very active fermentation will blow off a bunch of aromatic stuff. Whether it also increases the conversions I mentioned to a level which makes up for this, I highly doubt, but I’m not certain. I don’t know of any research specifically on this. If that did happen, that would be the reason to hop during fermentation: to increase hop aromatics

I think opening up the fermenter to add more hops is just releasing more aromatics out of the beer (the ones you’re smelling aren’t ending up in the finished beer) and introducing oxygen, which is bad for hop aroma, but it’s up to you, and if you like the beer you get out the other end, fire in.

 
HornyDevil
06:54 Fri 12/2/2016

Originally posted by GarethYoung
Fermentation is involved in the production of some hop-derived aromatic compounds, which is the reason for dry-hopping while there’s still fermentation activity doing on. Like I said, hopping during very active fermentation will blow off a bunch of aromatic stuff. Whether it also increases the conversions I mentioned to a level which makes up for this, I highly doubt, but I’m not certain. I don’t know of any research specifically on this. If that did happen, that would be the reason to hop during fermentation: to increase hop aromatics


Biotransformation of terpenoids is a pretty exciting topic. Some good reading here or by just googling "biotransformation of hops":

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257557116_Biotransformation_of_hop-derived_aroma_compounds_by_Saccharomyces_cerevisiae_upon_fermentation

A more basic, but no less good, article: http://draftmag.com/hop-compound-biotransformation/

Originally posted by GarethYoung
I think opening up the fermenter to add more hops is just releasing more aromatics out of the beer (the ones you’re smelling aren’t ending up in the finished beer) and introducing oxygen, which is bad for hop aroma, but it’s up to you, and if you like the beer you get out the other end, fire in.


Agreed.

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