Scotch Ale vs. Scottish Ale

Reads 6812 • Replies 16 • Started Friday, July 4, 2008 8:50:13 AM CT

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Beerman6686
beers 6607 º places 149 º 08:50 Fri 7/4/2008

I’ve been trying to figure out the difference between the styles and get them confused many times, can anyone help here?

 
maniac
beers 3801 º places 98 º 09:00 Fri 7/4/2008

Originally posted by Beerman6686
I’ve been trying to figure out the difference between the styles and get them confused many times, can anyone help here?


I some people don’t care much for BJCP, but here’s the BJCP guidelines for scottish and scotch ales:

http://www.bjcp.org/2008styles/style09.html

 
BBB63
beers 6567 º places 146 º 09:01 Fri 7/4/2008

Josh? Silktork? wanna answer this?

I consider Scotch ales have peaty and smoky overtone.
I consider Scottish ales mostly sweet malt with a HINT of peat or smoke.


====================================================
Scotch Ale
Though you won’t find too many examples of this style in Scotland, strong Scotch Ales have come into their own in the New World. The term denotes a strong, dark, malty ale typically ranging between 6.5-8.5%. The malt character has caramel and toffee leanings, but is most distinguished by the use of malt smoked over peat. The overall character is sweet, sometimes earthy, smoky or alcoholic as well. Yeast character is usually restrained.

Scottish Ale

Scottish ales are generally dark, malty, full-bodied brews. Many examples have a hint of smokiness derived from the use of peated malt. 60, 70, and 80 shilling examples are all session ales under 5% abv, but the stronger "wee heavies" can range closer to 8%, with the accompanying increase in alcohol flavour and esters. Works well as an accompaniment to hearty meat and game dishes, sharp cheddar, atholl brose and shortbread.

 
Christian
beers 16335 º places 278 º 09:03 Fri 7/4/2008

Scottish: A style.

Scotch: A nationality.

So an American Wee Heavy is a Scottish ale, but not a Scotch ale, and a Brewdog Paradox is a Scotch ale, but not a Scottish ale.

 
DonMagi
beers 5592 º places 50 º 09:06 Fri 7/4/2008

This is an interesting point. It was brought up in Plzen the fact that iv had about 600+ ales from scotland but never had a scottish ale. The definition on the site is 60, 70, 80, 90 shillings of which iv had many and probably of the examples avalible in scotland, but they are all catagorised as something else and not a scottish ale.

There ar other beers out there from scotland, such as Stewards Number 3, which is classified as a mild ale(a style pritty much confined to England) and says scotch ale on the badge(even though id agree its not a scotch ale, its a scottish ale in the style of a traditional 80/-).

Either way there are no and have never been any scottish ales ever made in scotland according to ratebeer, which is an interesting take on things indeed.

 
Oakes
admin
beers 27438 º places 1045 º 09:27 Fri 7/4/2008

Originally posted by Magic_dave6
This is an interesting point. It was brought up in Plzen the fact that iv had about 600+ ales from scotland but never had a scottish ale. The definition on the site is 60, 70, 80, 90 shillings of which iv had many and probably of the examples avalible in scotland, but they are all catagorised as something else and not a scottish ale.

There ar other beers out there from scotland, such as Stewards Number 3, which is classified as a mild ale(a style pritty much confined to England) and says scotch ale on the badge(even though id agree its not a scotch ale, its a scottish ale in the style of a traditional 80/-).

Either way there are no and have never been any scottish ales ever made in scotland according to ratebeer, which is an interesting take on things indeed.


It is, and I do not personally agree with that take but there is a good rationale behind it nonetheless. I addressed this in a thread while you were away. Sadly, that thread got hijacked after I answered the question.

The descriptions above are a starting point. Plus the (in need of updating) Beer Styles series I wrote are good places to start.

 
DonMagi
beers 5592 º places 50 º 09:29 Fri 7/4/2008

Originally posted by Oakes
Originally posted by Magic_dave6
This is an interesting point. It was brought up in Plzen the fact that iv had about 600+ ales from scotland but never had a scottish ale. The definition on the site is 60, 70, 80, 90 shillings of which iv had many and probably of the examples avalible in scotland, but they are all catagorised as something else and not a scottish ale.

There ar other beers out there from scotland, such as Stewards Number 3, which is classified as a mild ale(a style pritty much confined to England) and says scotch ale on the badge(even though id agree its not a scotch ale, its a scottish ale in the style of a traditional 80/-).

Either way there are no and have never been any scottish ales ever made in scotland according to ratebeer, which is an interesting take on things indeed.


It is, and I do not personally agree with that take but there is a good rationale behind it nonetheless. I addressed this in a thread while you were away. Sadly, that thread got hijacked after I answered the question.

The descriptions above are a starting point. Plus the (in need of updating) Beer Styles series I wrote are good places to start.




Link?

 
wunderbier
beers 1434 º places 17 º 09:43 Fri 7/4/2008

Originally posted by Magic_dave6
Originally posted by Oakes
Originally posted by Magic_dave6
This is an interesting point. It was brought up in Plzen the fact that iv had about 600+ ales from scotland but never had a scottish ale. The definition on the site is 60, 70, 80, 90 shillings of which iv had many and probably of the examples avalible in scotland, but they are all catagorised as something else and not a scottish ale.

There ar other beers out there from scotland, such as Stewards Number 3, which is classified as a mild ale(a style pritty much confined to England) and says scotch ale on the badge(even though id agree its not a scotch ale, its a scottish ale in the style of a traditional 80/-).

Either way there are no and have never been any scottish ales ever made in scotland according to ratebeer, which is an interesting take on things indeed.


It is, and I do not personally agree with that take but there is a good rationale behind it nonetheless. I addressed this in a thread while you were away. Sadly, that thread got hijacked after I answered the question.

The descriptions above are a starting point. Plus the (in need of updating) Beer Styles series I wrote are good places to start.




Link?

Link

 
DonMagi
beers 5592 º places 50 º 10:29 Fri 7/4/2008

After reading that link and from what craig and myself have just said, it puts forth an even bigger shout for the style "scottish ale" to be deleted. As most of them are bitters, golden ale and ESB’s.

 
Christian
beers 16335 º places 278 º 10:54 Fri 7/4/2008

Originally posted by Magic_dave6
After reading that link and from what craig and myself have just said, it puts forth an even bigger shout for the style "scottish ale" to be deleted. As most of them are bitters, golden ale and ESB’s.


Well, as a category for overly sweet, malty American ales, it works...

 
cgarvieuk
beers 34597 º places 453 º 10:58 Fri 7/4/2008

I read Silks article and found it very interesting, but i still think that the Scottish shilling series tend to differ from English ales.

I do think there more malty then most english ales, but like everything there cross overs