White Labs Yeast Vault

Reads 1848 • Replies 12 • Started Friday, December 18, 2015 5:25:31 PM CT

The forums you're viewing are the static, archived version. You won't be able to post or reply here.
Our new, modern forums are here:
RateBeer Forums

Thread Frozen
 
SpringsLicker
beers 3958 º places 158 º 08:41 Sun 12/20/2015

Originally posted by HornyDevil
Using yeast for multiple generations is a positive in many circumstances, BUT (and this is a big but) you have to know how long you can go in a linear fashion because every subsequent generation gives you genetic shift, which will, inevitably, give you a shift in what your yeast produce from a sensory perspective.


About 15 years ago when New Knoxville was brewing, they were at something like the 647th generation using Ringwood. The head brewer admitted that it was not an easy strain to use and was best used in an open fermentation set up. He told me that they had to dump about six or seven first generations until they yeast settled in with the proper flavor profiles that the yeast could produce. It’s a horrible yeast in it’s first few generations. That’s the only case I know of repeated re-use of yest. The yeast was top-cropped for the next brew. All of the other breweries I know of go about 6-7 generations with all of their strains.

 
HornyDevil
09:46 Sun 12/20/2015

Originally posted by SpringsLicker
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Using yeast for multiple generations is a positive in many circumstances, BUT (and this is a big but) you have to know how long you can go in a linear fashion because every subsequent generation gives you genetic shift, which will, inevitably, give you a shift in what your yeast produce from a sensory perspective.


About 15 years ago when New Knoxville was brewing, they were at something like the 647th generation using Ringwood. The head brewer admitted that it was not an easy strain to use and was best used in an open fermentation set up. He told me that they had to dump about six or seven first generations until they yeast settled in with the proper flavor profiles that the yeast could produce. It’s a horrible yeast in it’s first few generations. That’s the only case I know of repeated re-use of yest. The yeast was top-cropped for the next brew. All of the other breweries I know of go about 6-7 generations with all of their strains.


Wow. That’s quite a few generations. I’d wager that there are some German breweries with similar procedures.

BTW, my initial post should read "genetic DRIFT" not "genetic SHIFT".

Homebrew Shops - A collection of homebrew shops and supply houses submitted by RateBeer readers

Homebrewing Articles - RateBeer Magazine's homebrewing department

Homebrew Recipes - Experiment, share and post your own homebrew recipes

Until we can make beer come out of your monitor...

Beer2Buds
Send Beer Over The Net

Free signup now. Even out a trade, keep good vibes alive, say hi with a beer