Yeast recommendation

Reads 1686 • Replies 11 • Started Sunday, September 25, 2016 2:49:31 PM CT

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acodell
places 6 º 14:49 Sun 9/25/2016

I’m interested in a yeast recommendation for a juicy New England style IPA.

 
CLevar
places 23 º 16:16 Sun 9/25/2016

The Conan yeast (provided by a couple of the smaller yeast labs) isn’t a terrible option.

Sacch Trois is cool too, though make a large starter as White Lab insists on gouging the consumer and continues to sell this yeast at their "wild" cell counts and price.

In the end though, I’d argue that your grist and hop schedule is going to matter as much or more than yeast choice (within reason of course)

 
joeneugs
beers 6371 º places 241 º 16:44 Sun 9/25/2016

Yeah, Conan is what people usually use for this style. I like the Gigayeast version....I think they call it the Vermont ale strain. I’ve used other similar strains from lesser known yeast companies and had mixed results.

I like some of the English yeasts for juicy IPA’s as well. Wyeast 1318 and White Labs 007 are two that I used that made some beers similar to Trillium and Tree House IPA’s. They have a nice stone fruitiness that complements fruity hops well.



 
acodell
places 6 º 17:13 Sun 9/25/2016

Originally posted by CLevar
The Conan yeast (provided by a couple of the smaller yeast labs) isn’t a terrible option.

Sacch Trois is cool too, though make a large starter as White Lab insists on gouging the consumer and continues to sell this yeast at their "wild" cell counts and price.

In the end though, I’d argue that your grist and hop schedule is going to matter as much or more than yeast choice (within reason of course)


Thanks! I had a bumper year in the "hop yard".

 
acodell
places 6 º 17:21 Sun 9/25/2016

Originally posted by joeneugs
Yeah, Conan is what people usually use for this style. I like the Gigayeast version....I think they call it the Vermont ale strain. I’ve used other similar strains from lesser known yeast companies and had mixed results.

I like some of the English yeasts for juicy IPA’s as well. Wyeast 1318 and White Labs 007 are two that I used that made some beers similar to Trillium and Tree House IPA’s. They have a nice stone fruitiness that complements fruity hops well.






Thanks! I think that the Mad Fermentationist wrote about Wyeast 1318. The write up about it on Northern Brewer stated that it was highly flocculent. Don’t I want low floculent for this style?

 
spacecoyote
18:38 Sun 9/25/2016

Originally posted by CLevar
In the end though, I’d argue that your grist and hop schedule is going to matter as much or more than yeast choice (within reason of course)



This.

Also, another yeast that throws some nice stone-fruit esters is the Wyeast 1469, West Yorkshire. I’ve coaxed some cherry notes from it.

As far as flocculation goes, the yeasts that produce good IPA tend to be in the medium to high range. My best pale ales to date have been made with 1318 and 1469.

 
acodell
places 6 º 19:59 Sun 9/25/2016

Originally posted by acodell
Originally posted by CLevar
The Conan yeast (provided by a couple of the smaller yeast labs) isn’t a terrible option.

Sacch Trois is cool too, though make a large starter as White Lab insists on gouging the consumer and continues to sell this yeast at their "wild" cell counts and price.

In the end though, I’d argue that your grist and hop schedule is going to matter as much or more than yeast choice (within reason of course)


Thanks! I had a bumper year in the "hop yard".


Grist and hop schedule suggestions?

 
CLevar
places 23 º 20:07 Sun 9/25/2016

Originally posted by acodell
Originally posted by acodell
Originally posted by CLevar
The Conan yeast (provided by a couple of the smaller yeast labs) isn’t a terrible option.

Sacch Trois is cool too, though make a large starter as White Lab insists on gouging the consumer and continues to sell this yeast at their "wild" cell counts and price.

In the end though, I’d argue that your grist and hop schedule is going to matter as much or more than yeast choice (within reason of course)


Thanks! I had a bumper year in the "hop yard".


Grist and hop schedule suggestions?


Pils + oats or wheat, mash for middling attenuation (maybe 152, single infusion with a mash out), low or no bittering addition, load things up in the last ten min of the boil through the whirlpool. Cold crash for a short period of time. Using hops like Galaxy, citra, Nelson, mosaic, etc ( eg, the expensive ones) will help drive the "juicy" character. Drink fresh.

Or, add flour and don’t attempt to fine at all if you want it to really have that danksaucehazebro.

I don’t think it needs to be super hazy to have "juicy" character though. If anything, extra yeast in suspension will lead to a chalky astringent bitterness IMO. Just taste young lager or other beer at the end of d-rest

 
barncatmatt
beers 2287 º places 71 º 20:12 Sun 9/25/2016

Originally posted by acodell
Originally posted by acodell
Originally posted by CLevar
The Conan yeast (provided by a couple of the smaller yeast labs) isn’t a terrible option.

Sacch Trois is cool too, though make a large starter as White Lab insists on gouging the consumer and continues to sell this yeast at their "wild" cell counts and price.

In the end though, I’d argue that your grist and hop schedule is going to matter as much or more than yeast choice (within reason of course)


Thanks! I had a bumper year in the "hop yard".


Grist and hop schedule suggestions?


80% 2 row
20% flaked oat

mash @ 156F 45min

3 oz Amarillo @ FO
8 oz Citra @ dry hop (one week)

S-04

 
joeneugs
beers 6371 º places 241 º 20:23 Sun 9/25/2016

Originally posted by acodell
Originally posted by joeneugs
Yeah, Conan is what people usually use for this style. I like the Gigayeast version....I think they call it the Vermont ale strain. I’ve used other similar strains from lesser known yeast companies and had mixed results.

I like some of the English yeasts for juicy IPA’s as well. Wyeast 1318 and White Labs 007 are two that I used that made some beers similar to Trillium and Tree House IPA’s. They have a nice stone fruitiness that complements fruity hops well.






Thanks! I think that the Mad Fermentationist wrote about Wyeast 1318. The write up about it on Northern Brewer stated that it was highly flocculent. Don’t I want low floculent for this style?


In my experience, flocculation won’t matter too much if you’re dry hopping at the rate many brewers are these days. I’ve heard from several local brewers that they’re dry hopping at least 3 lbs. per barrel which calculates out to around 7-8 ounces per 5 gallons. With that much hop material, it will turn a clear beer super hazy as long as you don’t fine or filter afterwards.

Here’s a picture of my last "Northeast IPA"... like CLevar recommended, I used a grist of Pils, Wheat and Oats, but still had a pretty clear beer post fermentation with GigaYeast Vermont Ale.



After the dry hop, it turned super cloudy like you see above. I hopped with Galaxy, Citra and Simcoe. Turned out super juicy and awesome.

 
HornyDevil
05:17 Mon 9/26/2016

Originally posted by matt7215
Originally posted by acodell
Originally posted by acodell
Originally posted by CLevar
The Conan yeast (provided by a couple of the smaller yeast labs) isn’t a terrible option.

Sacch Trois is cool too, though make a large starter as White Lab insists on gouging the consumer and continues to sell this yeast at their "wild" cell counts and price.

In the end though, I’d argue that your grist and hop schedule is going to matter as much or more than yeast choice (within reason of course)


Thanks! I had a bumper year in the "hop yard".


Grist and hop schedule suggestions?


80% 2 row
20% flaked oat

mash @ 156F 45min

3 oz Amarillo @ FO
8 oz Citra @ dry hop (one week)

S-04


S04 is going to get you a very clear beer. Not that it’s a bad yeast, but for that reason it’s not a great New World IPA yeast.

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