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Brewing With Wine Yeast

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Stellaaaa
beers 260 º places 11 º 13:31 Wed 11/28/2012

I was wondering if anyone has any advice on brewing beer with wine yeast? Iím just curious as to how well this would work. Does anyone whoís tried it before have any advice or consideration on things to do differently with this different yeast. Iím just curious as to what the end result would taste like, so I thought I might give it a try just for fun.

 
ekstedt
premium
beers 6036 º places 155 º 14:09 Wed 11/28/2012

Originally posted by Stellaaaa
I was wondering if anyone has any advice on brewing beer with wine yeast? Iím just curious as to how well this would work. Does anyone whoís tried it before have any advice or consideration on things to do differently with this different yeast. Iím just curious as to what the end result would taste like, so I thought I might give it a try just for fun.


Made a split batch Nelson Sauvin Pale Ale about a year ago. One half was fermented with US-05, the other half with some anonymous dry wine yeast. The wine yeast version had a light belgian touch to it with some phenolics and esters. Kind of makes sense since it is speculated that some belgian yeast strains have their origins from french wine yeasts.

Give it a try!

 
pepperford
beers 115 º 17:57 Thu 11/29/2012

Brewing network has a episode on this. Lots of info

 
bitbucket
beers 2160 º places 63 º 21:32 Thu 11/29/2012

I brewed an old ale with flor sherry yeast. It came out pretty good.

 
FooFaa
beers 1 º places 29 º 21:35 Thu 11/29/2012

Proceed with caution. Wine yeasts, generally, have a hard time fermenting maltose and maltotriose, or altogether cannot.

 
bitbucket
beers 2160 º places 63 º 20:34 Sun 12/2/2012

Originally posted by FooFaa
Proceed with caution. Wine yeasts, generally, have a hard time fermenting maltose and maltotriose, or altogether cannot.

It seems odd that some strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae would be unable to consume fermentable sugars. In my limited experience it seems to work fine. Wine yeast has also worked well for the meads Iíve brewed.

 
drowland
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beers 7061 º places 216 º 20:56 Sun 12/2/2012

Brewed a ton of ciders with champagne and wine yeasts with great results

 
ekstedt
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beers 6036 º places 155 º 04:27 Mon 12/3/2012

Originally posted by bitbucket
Originally posted by FooFaa
Proceed with caution. Wine yeasts, generally, have a hard time fermenting maltose and maltotriose, or altogether cannot.

It seems odd that some strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae would be unable to consume fermentable sugars. In my limited experience it seems to work fine. Wine yeast has also worked well for the meads Iíve brewed.


What do you mean by "fermentable sugars"? The ability to ferment various sugars/carbohydrates varies among different types of yeasts and bacteria. Brettanomyces for instance have the ability to ferment just about anything. From an evolutionary perspective it makes sense that Sacharomyces strains adapted to wine could have a hard time fermenting maltose/maltotriose which are not present in grapes. That you have made successfull fermentaion of mead with wine yeast is not surprising considering the sugars present in honey.

In my split batch mentioned above I noticed better attenuation for the ale yeast compared to the wine yeast. From 1055 they fermeted down to 1010 and 1017 respectively.

 
bitbucket
beers 2160 º places 63 º 20:34 Mon 12/3/2012

Originally posted by ekstedt
Originally posted by bitbucket
Originally posted by FooFaa
Proceed with caution. Wine yeasts, generally, have a hard time fermenting maltose and maltotriose, or altogether cannot.

It seems odd that some strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae would be unable to consume fermentable sugars. In my limited experience it seems to work fine. Wine yeast has also worked well for the meads Iíve brewed.


What do you mean by "fermentable sugars"? The ability to ferment various sugars/carbohydrates varies among different types of yeasts and bacteria. Brettanomyces for instance have the ability to ferment just about anything. From an evolutionary perspective it makes sense that Sacharomyces strains adapted to wine could have a hard time fermenting maltose/maltotriose which are not present in grapes. That you have made successfull fermentaion of mead with wine yeast is not surprising considering the sugars present in honey.

In my split batch mentioned above I noticed better attenuation for the ale yeast compared to the wine yeast. From 1055 they fermeted down to 1010 and 1017 respectively.

1. There are different levels of attenuation even among different ale yeasts. This is different than "altogether cannot."
2. Ale yeast and wine yeast are both strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae, so I expect they have more in common with each other than with Brettanomyces.
3. Iíve been successful at brewing beer with wine yeast without attenuation problems, as Iíve noted earlier in this thread.
4. One observation is worth a thousand expert opinions.

 
mtoast
beers 336 º places 13 º 20:40 Mon 12/3/2012

Couple years ago I did a saison with Lalvin K1-V1116, I donít think I did everything to coerce full attenuation out of it, but it made a damn fine enough beer that I should revisit.

 
ekstedt
premium
beers 6036 º places 155 º 05:01 Tue 12/4/2012

Originally posted by bitbucket
Originally posted by ekstedt
Originally posted by bitbucket
Originally posted by FooFaa
Proceed with caution. Wine yeasts, generally, have a hard time fermenting maltose and maltotriose, or altogether cannot.

It seems odd that some strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae would be unable to consume fermentable sugars. In my limited experience it seems to work fine. Wine yeast has also worked well for the meads Iíve brewed.


What do you mean by "fermentable sugars"? The ability to ferment various sugars/carbohydrates varies among different types of yeasts and bacteria. Brettanomyces for instance have the ability to ferment just about anything. From an evolutionary perspective it makes sense that Sacharomyces strains adapted to wine could have a hard time fermenting maltose/maltotriose which are not present in grapes. That you have made successfull fermentaion of mead with wine yeast is not surprising considering the sugars present in honey.

In my split batch mentioned above I noticed better attenuation for the ale yeast compared to the wine yeast. From 1055 they fermeted down to 1010 and 1017 respectively.

1. There are different levels of attenuation even among different ale yeasts. This is different than "altogether cannot."
2. Ale yeast and wine yeast are both strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae, so I expect they have more in common with each other than with Brettanomyces.
3. Iíve been successful at brewing beer with wine yeast without attenuation problems, as Iíve noted earlier in this thread.
4. One observation is worth a thousand expert opinions.


All of this is trivially true (except for (4) which kind of depends on), but misses my point that it would hardly be that surprising if a Sach. C strain adapted to a maltose/maltotriose-free environment has a hard time metabolizing said sugars.

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