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Don Quijote clone recipe


read 1402 times • 18 replies • posted 11/26/2012 10:04:50 AM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by OldSock
Boil for a couple hours with a few ounces of well-aged hops (or aim for ~10 IBUs if you are using fresh hops). THis isnít as big a deal when not doing a true spontaneous fermentation


Iíve always wondered why anyone uses hops in sour beers. They inhibit lactobacillus and since weíre not selling it, donít have to answer to any government agency, and bitterness isnít a desired characteristic in sour beers I just donít see any reason to use them

Originally posted by OldSock
Cantillon does one to two years in oak primary before the beer is combined with the fruit in stainless steel tanks, usually for two to three months before bottling.


I think that the amount of time on fruit is a good guideline, but I think that you can get a beer sour and complex in less time than a year or two. 3 - 6 months of fermentation is probably ideal seeing as lacto is done pretty quickly and Brett is basically done in 3 months.

Originally posted by OldSock
Most of their fruit beers tend to be 2-3 lbs of fruit per gallon, start on the low end (about a gallon of juice mixed with 4 gallons of beer).


Agreed on this amount of fruit. Any less and youíll be disappointed with the fruit character.

If the OP decides to use the Welchís concentrate, heíd need to double the amount that I posted to get it in that range.
11/26/2012 12:53:51 PM

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OldSock
Originally posted by HornyDevil
Iíve always wondered why anyone uses hops in sour beers. They inhibit lactobacillus and since weíre not selling it, donít have to answer to any government agency, and bitterness isnít a desired characteristic in sour beers I just donít see any reason to use them

I think that the amount of time on fruit is a good guideline, but I think that you can get a beer sour and complex in less time than a year or two. 3 - 6 months of fermentation is probably ideal seeing as lacto is done pretty quickly and Brett is basically done in 3 months.

Agreed on this amount of fruit. Any less and youíll be disappointed with the fruit character.

If the OP decides to use the Welchís concentrate, heíd need to double the amount that I posted to get it in that range.


Hops (and many spices) contain compounds called glycosides that are the combination of a sugar and an aromatic molecule. Some strains of Brett (those that produce beta-glycosidase) are able to ferment the sugar, liberating the aromatic molecule. How important is this to the final flavor of a lambic? I really have no idea, but with the time and effort that goes into these beers why not spend a couple bucks to buy them or leave some extra low AA% varieties sitting around open?

Odds are there isnít much Lacto alive in the Cantillon bottles, given their high hopping rate, so heíll be relying on slower moving Pedio. Iíd rather save the fruit for as late as possible to preserve its fresh aromatics. Personal choice and what-not. Works either way, but the results will be different.

If there is anything Iím really coming to accept from two years of researching how different breweries make their sour beers, itís that there is never a single right/ideal answer to any step/ingredient. There is only developing a complete process that fits your time/equipment/tastes.
11/26/2012 1:36:03 PM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by OldSock
If there is anything Iím really coming to accept from two years of researching how different breweries make their sour beers, itís that there is never a single right/ideal answer to any step/ingredient. There is only developing a complete process that fits your time/equipment/tastes.


Well said.
11/26/2012 2:02:01 PM

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HornyDevil
On this subject, I have a batch aging that took half a batch of 100% dark Munich sour base and combined it with a half pound of D90 and 46 oz. of Welchís Concord grape concentrate. Brewed the base beer in May and put it on the grape concentrate in September. Will probably bottle it in December or January. Anxious to taste what the grape conc. did to the base as on racking the base was nicely tart, but lacked any real complexity.
11/26/2012 2:10:16 PM

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traPISSED 99:
Message levifunk
11/26/2012 2:20:59 PM

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Unclerudy 12:3
Horny, You ever bottle this yet?
2/21/2013 7:12:32 AM

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HornyDevil
Originally posted by Unclerudy
Horny, You ever bottle this yet?


I wish, but itís not ready yet. Most probably will bottle it in May. Iíll post results when I do.
2/21/2013 7:29:13 AM

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Unclerudy 12:3
I was thinking of taking my new england cider out my barrel that it has been in for a year, and throwing in a lambic that I am brewing this weekend. Or letting the beer ferment in the carboy and then add it to the barrel later with the juice concentrate.
2/21/2013 7:39:29 AM

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