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Oklahoma Onion Burgers

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jzzbassman
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beers 1525 º places 29 º 22:02 Wed 5/22/2013

In light of the tornadoes this week, I thought I should post one of Oklahomaís great contributions to food.

Invented during the Depression to make beef stretch better, they are very simple but one of those dishes that are way greater than the sum of their parts.

Good approximation recipe:
http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Sids-Onion-Burger

A few notes after making this a second time tonight:
1. I use an iron skillet, hot.
2. Thanks to cheeseman, great advise to smash the burger balls into a thin patty in the skillet with a big can. I used a can of San Marzanos I had in the pantry with some wax paper and a rubber band to keep it clean.
3. Yes really. That many onions. Smash them into the meat good as stated about a minute before flipping
4. When the onions are looking like they are browning well meat is pretty much done. Throw some cheese on top and I inverted another skillet to "dome" it to melt quickly.
5. Traditional toppings are usually very minimal. The way it is usually served is ketchup, mustard, and pickle.



 
Swillbur
beers 62 º places 25 º 22:13 Wed 5/22/2013

Look out for Prairie Artisan ales!

 
Swillbur
beers 62 º places 25 º 22:14 Wed 5/22/2013

that sounds good too

 
joet
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beers 2408 º places 100 º 04:08 Thu 5/23/2013

Thanks for the positive nod to Oklahoma, a place still suffering Mondayís horrible tornado tragedy.

Good to see Saveur recognizing this perfect, simple food. What do you think of adding sweet, dark beer as recommended after the recipe? We used to have turkey burger stout recipe around here that was not all that far from these onion burgers.

 
Cobra
beers 1100 º places 24 º 05:20 Thu 5/23/2013

My thoughts go out to Oakies too. I hope they pull thru this terrible tragedy.

That said, the best onion burger I ever had was a little sidewalk stand in Vicksburg, Mississippi, of all places. They shaved the onions on a deli slicer so thin, they only had one side. They had a really old gas fired griddle, probably made around the Civil War.
Fried the onions a few mins, then smashed the burger balls into the onions. One side only. Served with mustard & dill pickle chips on a soft potato roll. The grease burns were heavenly.


(P.S.- I have kin folk in Tulsa OK, so Iím allowed to call them Oakies.)

 
pinkie
beers 470 º places 10 º 06:27 Thu 5/23/2013

Iím gonna make this recipe in their honor. =) Thanks.

 
Shaftie
beers 218 º places 8 º 07:08 Thu 5/23/2013

We Okies are a resilent lot. Most of my fellow Oklahomans will appreciate even the smallest symbolic gesture.

Regards

 
mkgrenwel
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beers 602 º places 113 º 07:11 Thu 5/23/2013

Originally posted by Cobra
(P.S.- I have kin folk in Tulsa OK, so Iím allowed to call them Oakies.)


P.P.S. Then you should know itís Okie.

 
Shaftie
beers 218 º places 8 º 07:17 Thu 5/23/2013

Originally posted by mkgrenwel
Originally posted by Cobra
(P.S.- I have kin folk in Tulsa OK, so Iím allowed to call them Oakies.)


P.P.S. Then you should know itís Okie.


^ The real reason behind my post. I suppose if any place should mix it up itís a place that goes crazy for barrel-aged treatments and tossing in oak chips.

 
PhillyBeer2112
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beers 2653 º places 67 º 12:58 Thu 5/23/2013

This sounds like a down home version of a White Castle burger, and I wonder if thereís a connection since White Castle/Kingís X burgers started in Wichita, not far from Oklahoma.
When I make my imitation white castle sliders at home I use onion soup mix in the patties, and sauteed diced onions and a pickle as the only toppings.

 
jzzbassman
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beers 1525 º places 29 º 16:20 Thu 5/23/2013

Originally posted by PhillyBeer2112
This sounds like a down home version of a White Castle burger, and I wonder if thereís a connection since White Castle/Kingís X burgers started in Wichita, not far from Oklahoma.
When I make my imitation white castle sliders at home I use onion soup mix in the patties, and sauteed diced onions and a pickle as the only toppings.


Sort of but not really. The difference is the sheer amount of sweet onion. Weíre talking a half of a small onion per 1/4 lb patty!

It makes for great flavor when cooked to just before burnt on the onion side.

Cobra, the Vicksburg place sounds interesting. Iím on the other side of the state and Iíve never seen it make outside of Oklahoma, but what you describe sounds very much like them.

Up here in North Mississippi the answer to the Depression was the "Slugburger" (so named because they used to cost a nickel or slug as it was known in slang) or "doughburger" depending on what town you are in. Iím not a big fan....you stretch the meat by adding bread. There is a place here in my town of New Albany just featured on Travel Channelís Burger Land called Lathamís that does an unusual version that the host loved, with the flavor coming from being fried in a 70 year old iron skillet, but as he said it doesnít taste at all like a burger, it is totally different.