Maple syrup added to a finished beer

Reads 3175 • Replies 9 • Started Monday, May 9, 2016 8:42:42 AM CT

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Berbatov
beers 30 º places 6 º 08:42 Mon 5/9/2016

Hey guys,

I have an imperial stout that’s all done. just a bit bitter, so for
fun i wanted to add maple syrup to a couple of 5 gallon kegs.

Anyone have any advice.
The beer will stay cold and will be served
within a week so i’m not worried about additional fermentation.
From what i have read, i’m looking at 12-16oz per keg?

thanks so much!

 
skinnyguy
08:51 Mon 5/9/2016

Originally posted by Berbatov
Hey guys,

I have an imperial stout that’s all done. just a bit bitter, so for
fun i wanted to add maple syrup to a couple of 5 gallon kegs.

Anyone have any advice.
The beer will stay cold and will be served
within a week so i’m not worried about additional fermentation.
From what i have read, i’m looking at 12-16oz per keg?

thanks so much!


I’m not sure on amounts for adding to finished beer. The main suggestion I do have is to use Grade B maple syrup (usually found in bulk at Co-ops). It is less sweet with way more maple flavor. I would also dissolve the syrup in a little warm water before adding to it can be more easily dispersed in the beer. Otherwise you might end up with a concentration near the bottom.

 
Williamhunter
14:44 Mon 5/9/2016

I also would suggest using Grade B maple syrup.

 
skinnyguy
14:49 Mon 5/9/2016

Originally posted by Williamhunter
I also would suggest using Grade B maple syrup.


I would suggest using it whenever someone wants syrup. It tastes so much better. But especially in cooking when so much of the flavor and aroma dissipates.

 
Berbatov
beers 30 º places 6 º 12:01 Wed 5/11/2016

thanks gents

 
skinnyguy
13:32 Wed 5/11/2016

Since this is for a finished beer, one thing you could do is pull a measured sample (say 16 oz) and add your syrup mixture until the sample hits your desired profile (just like a spice tincture). Then apply your measurements to the full batch.

For adding prior to fermentation, I’ve done 3.5 lb of Grade B in an imperial maple brown ale, and 1-2 lb in an imperial stout (that had lot’s of other adjuncts as well).

 
StefanSD
beers 2449 º places 57 º 14:52 Wed 5/11/2016

Originally posted by skinnyguy
Since this is for a finished beer, one thing you could do is pull a measured sample (say 16 oz) and add your syrup mixture until the sample hits your desired profile (just like a spice tincture). Then apply your measurements to the full batch.

For adding prior to fermentation, I’ve done 3.5 lb of Grade B in an imperial maple brown ale, and 1-2 lb in an imperial stout (that had lot’s of other adjuncts as well).


This sounds like good advice.

One thing that is not clear to me -- will adding this syrup really cancel out bitterness as the OP intends. My concern is that you are most likely creating a Frankenstein.

 
JulienHuxley
beers 6219 º places 450 º 14:59 Wed 5/11/2016

Originally posted by StefanSD
Originally posted by skinnyguy
Since this is for a finished beer, one thing you could do is pull a measured sample (say 16 oz) and add your syrup mixture until the sample hits your desired profile (just like a spice tincture). Then apply your measurements to the full batch.

For adding prior to fermentation, I’ve done 3.5 lb of Grade B in an imperial maple brown ale, and 1-2 lb in an imperial stout (that had lot’s of other adjuncts as well).


This sounds like good advice.

One thing that is not clear to me -- will adding this syrup really cancel out bitterness as the OP intends. My concern is that you are most likely creating a Frankenstein.


I think you’re right about the Frankenstein.

FWIW I add 1 lb of B-classed maple syrup /5 gals in secondary of my Maple brown (brown ale brewed with maple sap) and get pretty decent maple flavour.

 
jbruner
beers 8201 º places 464 º 23:20 Wed 5/11/2016




This sounds like good advice.

One thing that is not clear to me -- will adding this syrup really cancel out bitterness as the OP intends. My concern is that you are most likely creating a Frankenstein.


Frankenstein was a cool dude. But yes, you’re adding sweetness, which complements and subdues the bitterness. Because it will be kept cold, definitely dissolve it in some warm water to mix well. And the tincture method is ideal, almost like adding in an extract, which if you want a vanilla version, isn’t a bad idea to counteract the bitterness either.

 
Berbatov
beers 30 º places 6 º 07:38 Mon 5/16/2016

cheers! will be done by next week. will update with how it goes

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