Zero IBUs IPAs

Reads 1465 • Replies 28 • Started Tuesday, October 31, 2017 8:31:53 PM CT

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Bitterbill
beers 2636 º places 25 º 20:31 Tue 10/31/2017

What's up with that?

 
SinH4
beers 12152 º places 406 º 22:07 Tue 10/31/2017

I've had at least one.

Loved it. But I also love freshly pressed orange juice, so...

 
LazyPyro
beers 4224 º places 58 º 22:14 Tue 10/31/2017

Are they actually a thing now? I had one a couple of months ago and it was the first time I'd ever seen one. There's literally only 9 in the entire database that have the tag https://www.ratebeer.com/tag/zero-ibu/

If there are more it would be nice if people could add the tag to them, I'm curious now what kind of ratings they get. For me personally I enjoyed the one I had but I found myself kind of missing some bitterness. But I reckon they'd be good beers to give to people who perhaps only drink lagers/trad stuff who you want to ease into the world of IPAs without blowing them away with extreme bitterness.

 
CLevar
places 23 º 23:21 Tue 10/31/2017

Unless there are exactly zero hops in the fermented malt beverage in question, I’m going to be that guy and ask for the HPLC data before I believe such outlandish claims.

 
Scopey
beers 19997 º places 716 º 08:25 Wed 11/1/2017

Recent studies show that dry hopping does in fact impart bitterness onto a beer... so these are more like low IBU beers perhaps, not zero.

 
caesar
beers 7643 º places 411 º 08:36 Wed 11/1/2017

Originally posted by Scopey
Recent studies show that dry hopping does in fact impart bitterness onto a beer... so these are more like low IBU beers perhaps, not zero.


Do you have links to these studies? I have always thought that dry hopping adds bitterness, but my hypothesis is that it depends on how much IBU is already in the wort. Same goes for other hop additions after boiling.

 
Bitterbill
beers 2636 º places 25 º 09:19 Wed 11/1/2017

Originally posted by LazyPyro
Are they actually a thing now? I had one a couple of months ago and it was the first time I'd ever seen one. There's literally only 9 in the entire database that have the tag https://www.ratebeer.com/tag/zero-ibu/

If there are more it would be nice if people could add the tag to them, I'm curious now what kind of ratings they get. For me personally I enjoyed the one I had but I found myself kind of missing some bitterness. But I reckon they'd be good beers to give to people who perhaps only drink lagers/trad stuff who you want to ease into the world of IPAs without blowing them away with extreme bitterness.


I tagged the Grand Teton one, Hoplexity.

 
CLevar
places 23 º 09:21 Wed 11/1/2017

Bitterness and IBU are two different things. IBU is defined as isomerized alpha acid (1IBU=1ppm iso alpha acid) and while that’s often the primary bittering compound in a beer, other hop compounds also contribute bitterness. John Paul Maye (sp?) has done a lot of research into the interactions between hop compounds in dry hopped beers and his results really suggest that IBU isn’t a great measure of bitterness in beers


That said, many times these beers are called “zero IBU” because all the hot side hops are added as a low temp WP addition. Even a WP at a very low temp will have some (very small) amount of isomerization that occurs, so calling it zero IBU without actually testing it seems rather presumptive to me.

 
caesar
beers 7643 º places 411 º 09:51 Wed 11/1/2017

Originally posted by CLevarThat said, many times these beers are called “zero IBU” because all the hot side hops are added as a low temp WP addition. Even a WP at a very low temp will have some (very small) amount of isomerization that occurs, so calling it zero IBU without actually testing it seems rather presumptive to me.


That's exactly what I think. But when a beer has already 20+ IBU from hot side hops, I doubt there will be much extra isomerization from dryhopping.

I would love to see some simple experiments.

0 IBU + 2 g/L dryhopping
2 IBU + 2 g/L dryhopping
5 IBU + 2 g/L dryhopping
etc etc. with 10/20/40/80 IBU, something in that range.

And then do the same for each IBU: 0 g/L dryhopping, 0.1 g/L, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0.

This way you get a range of IBUs vs a range of dryhopping. Then measure the IBU (and/or other hop compounds of choice).

 
Scopey
beers 19997 º places 716 º 10:05 Wed 11/1/2017

Originally posted by caesar
Originally posted by Scopey
Recent studies show that dry hopping does in fact impart bitterness onto a beer... so these are more like low IBU beers perhaps, not zero.


Do you have links to these studies? I have always thought that dry hopping adds bitterness, but my hypothesis is that it depends on how much IBU is already in the wort. Same goes for other hop additions after boiling.

http://hopsteiner.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/TQ-53-3-0808-01.pdf

 
caesar
beers 7643 º places 411 º 10:50 Wed 11/1/2017

So, it seems we are in need of a better measure for bitterness. :-)